Radio patent granted to Guglielmo Marconi

On June 2, 1896, British patent No.12039, for a radio was granted to radio pioneer Guglielmo Marconi. Continue reading

A Taoist state

Circa 200 CE a Taoist state was set up by Zhang Lu, the third Taoist patriarch, in Han-chung (now part of the Chinese provinces of Szechwan and Shensi), from which its army formed the rebellion against the Han dynasty and was known as the Five Pecks of Rice. Continue reading

Treatise on smallpox was De variolis et morbillis

Circa 900 CE, Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn Zakariya al-Razi (aka in Latin as Rhazes), leading Muslim physician of the era, wrote the Treatise on smallpox called De variolis et morbillis (Treatise on the Small Pox and Measles). Continue reading

Avalanche of the 20th century to kill 10,000 people

On December 13, 1916, in the Italian Alps, an Avalanche buried many villages and causing an estimated 10,000 casualties. Continue reading

Comic strip published as a booklet

Rodolphe Topffer of Geneva, Switzerland, artist and writer of a comic strip called The Adventures of Dr. Festus. Continue reading

Receiver that could detect radio waves produced by lightning discharges

Aleksandr Stepanovich Popov, a Russian Radio inventor, claimed by historians from the former Soviet Union, had a meeting with the Russian Physical and Chemical Society that took place on May 7, 1895. Continue reading

First World Chess Champion

London in 1886, the Austrian grandmaster, Wilhelm Steinitz, became the first player to earn the official title of “World Chess Champion” as he defeated Johannes Zukertort. Continue reading

The Yellow Turban Rebellion

The Yellow Turban Rebellion was an uprising against the degenerating Han dynasty that began in eastern China in 184 under a Taoist faith healer, Chang Chtieh, lasting some 20 years. Continue reading

The First soccer club

Sheffield Football Club, was the first soccer club, founded in 1857 in the town of Sheffield, England. Continue reading

Gautama Siddhartha

Gautama Buddha (c. 563 BCE/480 BCE – c. 483 BCE/400 BCE), also known as Siddhārtha Gautama [sid̪ːʱɑːrt̪ʰə gəut̪əmə], Shakyamuni Buddha [ɕɑːkjəmun̪i bud̪ːʱə], or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was an ascetic (śramaṇa) and sage, on whose teachings Buddhism was founded. He is believed to have lived and taught mostly in the eastern part of ancient India sometime between the sixth and fourth centuries BCE.

Gautama taught a Middle Way between sensual indulgence and the severe asceticism found in the śramaṇa movement common in his region. He later taught throughout other regions of eastern India such as Magadha and Kosala.

Gautama is the primary figure in Buddhism. He is recognized by Buddhists as an enlightened teacher who attained full Buddhahood, and shared his insights to help sentient beings end rebirth and suffering. Accounts of his life, discourses, and monastic rules are believed by Buddhists to have been summarized after his death and memorized by his followers. Various collections of teachings attributed to him were passed down by oral tradition and first committed to writing about 400 years later.

More info at: Gautama Buddha – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Gautame Siddhartha
Occupation:
      Founder of Buddhism
Birth:
      c. 563 BCE or c. 480 BCE
     Lumbini, Shakya Republic
Death:
      c. 483 BCE or c. 400 BCE
     Kushinagar, Malla Republic


Additional Information: