New Zealand Nuclear-Free Zone

New Zealand in 1984 established a National Nuclear-Free Zone.

Date:
      1984
Location:
New Zealand


Additional Information:

  • New Zealand nuclear-free zone – Wikipedia
    Under the New Zealand Nuclear Free Zone, Disarmament, and Arms Control Act 1987, territorial sea, land and airspace of New Zealand became nuclear-free zones. This has since remained a part of New Zealand’s foreign policy.
  • Nuclear-free legislation – Nuclear-free New Zealand | NZHistory, New …
    It was election year in 1984, and Robert Muldoon decided to go to the polls early, on 14 July. This was due partly to a decision by Marilyn Waring, a National Party Member of Parliament, to withdraw her support for the National caucus on 14 June.
  • New Zealand goes nuclear-free | NZHistory, New Zealand history online
    The Act was passed in the aftermath of the mid-1980s nuclear ships stand-off between New Zealand and the United States. The nuclear-free movement, however, had its roots in ideas that emerged in the 1960s: a push for an independent, ethical foreign policy, which had grown out of opposition to the Vietnam War; and environmentalism, which sought to preserve New Zealand as a green unspoilt land.
  • New Zealand Nuclear Free Zone, Disarmament, and Arms Control Act …
    An Act to establish in New Zealand a Nuclear Free Zone, to promote and encourage an active and effective contribution by New Zealand to the essential process of disarmament and international arms control, and to implement in New Zealand the following treaties:
  • Nuclear Free New Zealand | GREENPEACE New Zealand
    New Zealand became Nuclear Free in 1987, with the passing of a strong anti-nuclear law. Our legislation encompasses our stance as a nation opposing weapons of mass destruction, supports nuclear disarmament and contributes significantly to the international discussion.
  • New Zealand Nuclear Free Zone Extension Bill – (via the Wayback Machine)
    The Nuclear Free Zone, Disarmament and Arms Control Act 1987 is severely limited in its ability to protect New Zealand from possible nuclear accidents which would devastate our waters and coastline.

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