Howard Walter Florey, first Oceanian to receive Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

First Oceanian presented the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was in 1945

Howard Walter Florey (born in Adelaide, Australia), was presented with the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1945, he shared this award with Alexander Fleming and Ernst Boris Chain.

Quote: “for the discovery of penicillin and its curative effect in various infectious diseases.”

Additional Information:

  • Sir Howard Florey: Biographical
    Sir Howard Walter Florey was born on September 24, 1898, at Adelaide, South Australia, the son of Joseph and Bertha Mary Florey. His early education was at St. Peter’s Collegiate School, Adelaide, following which he went on to Adelaide University where he graduated M.B., B.S. in 1921.
  • Sir Howard Florey: Facts
    After Alexander Fleming’s 1928 discovery that a certain mold produced a substance called penicillin that inhibited the growth of bacteria, it was not a major leap to think that penicillin could be used as a pharmaceutical.
  • Sir Howard Florey: Nobel Lecture (via the Wayback Machine) – PDF
    I have recently had the honour of lecturing in Sweden on the way in which the properties of penicillin came to be revealed from laboratory experiments and the development in the clinic of the application of the knowledge so acquired.
  • Sir Howard Florey: Banquet Speech
    Your Royal Highnesses, Your Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen. I should wish in the first place to thank most sincerely the Nobel Foundation and the Committee for Physiology and Medicine for the very great honour you have conferred on me today.
  • Sir Howard Florey: Nominations
    Nominated on 17 occasions for the Nobel Prize in
  • Sir Alexander Fleming: Biographical
    Sir Alexander Fleming was born at Lochfield near Darvel in Ayrshire, Scotland on August 6th, 1881.
  • Howard Florey – Wikipedia
    Howard Walter Florey, Baron Florey, OM, FRS, FRCP (24 September 1898 – 21 February 1968) was an Australian pharmacologist and pathologist who shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1945 with Sir Ernst Boris Chain and Sir Alexander Fleming for his role in the development of penicillin.
  • Howard Walter Florey and Ernst Boris Chain | Chemical Heritage …
    Howard Walter Florey (1898–1968) and Ernst Boris Chain (1906–1979) were the scientists who followed up most successfully on Alexander Fleming’s discovery of penicillin, sharing with him the 1945 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
  • Howard Walter Florey facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com …
    Florey’s scientific career was devoted to the experimental study of disease processes. His most notable contribution to science was the development of penicillin as a systemic antibacterial antibiotic suitable for use in man.
  • Biography – Howard Walter Florey – Australian Dictionary of Biography
    Howard Walter Florey, Baron Florey of Adelaide and Marston (1898-1968), medical scientist, was born on 24 September 1898 at Malvern, Adelaide, third and youngest child and only son of Joseph Florey, a boot manufacturer from England, and his second wife, native-born Bertha Mary, née Wadham.
  • Sir Howard Walter Florey–the force behind the development of penicillin.
    The development of penicillin was a watershed in the battle against infectious diseases. The primary individuals responsible for its discovery and development were Sir Alexander Fleming, Sir Howard Walter Florey, and Ernst B. Chain, now primary figures in the annals of medical history.
  • Howard Walter Florey, Baron Florey | Australian pathologist …
    Howard Walter Florey, Baron Florey, (born Sept. 24, 1898, Adelaide, Australia—died Feb. 21, 1968, Oxford, Eng.), Australian pathologist who, with Ernst Boris Chain, isolated and purified penicillin (discovered in 1928 by Sir Alexander Fleming) for general clinical use.
  • Australian Nobel Laureates – Howard Walter Florey
    Howard Walter Florey is best known for his work on penicillin, but there is much more to this famous Australian scientist. He was a solitary man, with few close friends; laboratory research and travel were his great loves. Interestingly, he was concerned about the population explosion caused by improving health care.
Date:
      1945
Name(s):
      Howard Walter Florey

Sir Alexander Fleming

About:

Born:
      September 24, 1898, Adelaide, Australia
Died:
      February 21, 1968, Oxford, United Kingdom
Spouse:
      Margaret Jennings (m. 1967–1968),
     Ethel Reed (m. 1926–1966)
Children:
      Charles du Vé Florey,
     Paquita Mary Joanna Florey


Additional Information: Of the other two award winners

  • Sir Alexander Fleming: Facts
    Among microorganisms, life is a constant battle for survival. Alexander Fleming became interested in this.
  • Sir Alexander Fleming: Nobel Lecture (via the Wayback Machine) – PDF
    I am going to tell you about the early days of penicillin, for this is the part of the penicillin story which earned me a Nobel Award.
  • Sir Alexander Fleming: Banquet Speech
    For many years I have read of people getting the Nobel Prize. Then I always regarded them as a superior class to which it was almost impossible to aspire.
  • Sir Alexander Fleming: Nominations
    Nominated on 32 occasions for the Nobel Prize in…
  • Sir Alexander Fleming: Photo Gallery of
    One Photo
  • Ernst B. Chain: Biographical
    Ernst Boris Chain was born on June 19, 1906, in Berlin, his father, Dr. Michael Chain, being a chemist and industrialist. He was educated at the Luisengymnasium, Berlin, where he soon became interested in chemistry, stimulated by visits to his father’s laboratory and factory.
  • Ernst B. Chain: Facts
    After Alexander Fleming’s 1928 discovery that a certain mold produced a substance called penicillin that inhibited the growth of bacteria, it was not a major leap to think that penicillin could be used as a pharmaceutical.
  • Ernst B. Chain: Nobel Lecture (via the Wayback Machine) – PDF
    Before beginning with the subject proper of this lecture let me give you a few details of the historical development of the chemical work on penicillin
    and its organization.
  • Ernst B. Chain: Banquet Speech
    Your Royal Highnesses, Your Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen. I should like to express to you my deep gratitude for the very great honour conferred on me by the award of a Nobel prize which has come to be regarded universally as the highest distinction a scientist may hope to achieve.
  • Ernst B. Chain: Nominations
    Nominated on 2 occasions for the Nobel Prize in…

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