Augustus Caesar

Augustus (Latin: Imperātor Caesar Dīvī Fīlius Augustus; 23 September 63 BC – 19 August 14 AD) was the founder of the Roman Principate and considered the first Roman emperor, controlling the Roman Empire from 27 BC until his death in AD 14.

He was born Gaius Octavius into an old and wealthy equestrian branch of the plebeian gens Octavia. His maternal great-uncle Julius Caesar was assassinated in 44 BC, and Octavius was named in Caesar’s will as his adopted son and heir, then known as Octavianus (Anglicized as Octavian). He, Mark Antony, and Marcus Lepidus formed the Second Triumvirate to defeat the assassins of Caesar. Following their victory at the Battle of Philippi, the Triumvirate divided the Roman Republic among themselves and ruled as military dictators.[note 4] The Triumvirate was eventually torn apart by the competing ambitions of its members. Lepidus was driven into exile and stripped of his position, and Antony committed suicide following his defeat at the Battle of Actium by Octavian in 31 BC.

More at:Augustus – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Gaius Octavius
      AKA Augustus Caesar
Occupation:
      1st Roman emperor
Birth:
      September 23rd 63 BC
      Rome, Roman Republic
Death:
      19 August AD 14
      Nola, Italia, Roman Empire
Spouse:
      Clodia Pulchra (42–40 BC; divorce)
      Scribonia (40–38 BC; divorce)
      Livia Drusilla (37 BC–AD 14; his death)


Additional Information:

  • Augustus – Wikipedia
    At birth, he was named Gaius Octavius after his biological father. Historians typically refer to him simply as Octavius (or Octavian) between his birth in 63 until his adoption by Julius Caesar in 44 BC (after Julius Caesar’s death).
  • Augustus | Roman emperor | Britannica.com
    Augustus, also called Augustus Caesar or (until 27 bce) Octavian, original name Gaius Octavius, adopted name Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus (born September 23, 63 bce—died August 19, 14 ce, Nola, near Naples [Italy]), first Roman emperor, following the republic, which had been finally destroyed by the dictatorship of Julius Caesar, his great-uncle and adoptive father. His autocratic regime is known as the principate because he was the princeps, the first citizen, at the head of that array of outwardly revived republican institutions that alone made his autocracy palatable.
  • Caesar Augustus – Emperor – Biography.com
    Caesar Augustus, or Octavian, became the first emperor of the Roman Empire after Julius Caesar died. The country was peaceful under Augustus’s rule.
  • Augustus – Ancient History – HISTORY.com
    Of Augustus’ many names and honorifics, historians favor three of them, each for a different phase in the emperor’s life.
  • Octavian – Augustus – The Roman Empire
    The future emperor Augustus was born into an equestrian family as Gaius Octavius at Rome on 23 September 63 BC. His father, Gaius Octavius, was the first in the family to become a senator, but died when Octavian was only four.
  • Augustus – Ancient History Encyclopedia
    Augustus Caesar (63 BCE – 14 CE) was the name of the first (and, by all accounts, greatest) emperor of Rome. Augustus was born Gaius Octavius Thurinus on 23 September 63 BCE. He was adopted by his great-uncle Julius Caesar in 44 BCE, and then took the name Gaius Julius Caesar. In 27 BCE the Senate awarded him the honorific Augustus (“the illustrious one”), and he was then known as Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus.
  • BBC – History – Augustus
    Augustus was the first emperor of Rome. He replaced the Roman republic with an effective monarchy and during his long reign brought peace and stability.
  • The Timeline of the Life of Octavian, Caesar Augustus
    Historically Caesar Augustus was far more important than his great uncle Julius Caesar.
  • Augustus – PBS
    Adopted by Caesar, Augustus (c.62 BC – 14 AD / Reigned 31 BC – 14 AD) had to fight for his throne. His long rule saw a huge expansion in the Roman Empire and the beginnings of a dynasty that, over the next century, would transform Rome, for better and worse.

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