Isambard Kingdom Brunel

Isambard Kingdom Brunel FRS (/ˈɪzəmˌbɑːd bruːˈnɛl/; 9 April 1806 – 15 September 1859), was an English mechanical and civil engineer who is considered “one of the most ingenious and prolific figures in engineering history”, “one of the 19th century engineering giants”, and “one of the greatest figures of the Industrial Revolution, [who] changed the face of the English landscape with his groundbreaking designs and ingenious constructions”. Continue reading

Anemometer for measuring air speed

Invented by English physicist Robert Hooke in 1644, his anemometer for measuring air speed device counted the turns of a horizontal bladed rotor exposed to the wind.
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Isabella Beeton

In 1857, less than a year after the wedding, Isabella began writing for one of her husband’s publications, The Englishwoman’s Domestic Magazine. Continue reading

Field hockey

The first modern men’s field hockey club was Blackheath, founded circa 1861 in London, England. Continue reading

Persian Royal Road a very long road

The road called Persian Royal Road ran east-west across Anatolia for more than 1,500 miles (2,400 km) between the capital city of Susa, Persia (now the village of Shush, Iran), and Smyrna (now Iz-mir, Turkey), on the Aegean coast, passing through Nineveh and Haran, with a second terminus at Ephesus. Continue reading

Comic strip in a daily newspaper

Chicago American daily newspaper in 1904, printed a comic strip in black and white, called “A. Piker Clerk,” by Claire Briggs, an artist and author. Continue reading

The Shaper: for Iron works

Around 1826 an Inventor by the name of James Nasmyth of Manchester, England, invented the Shaper. Continue reading

A personal name to survive in the written records

The name was En-lil-ti, the personal name which has survive in written records, was inscribed on clay tablets in Sumer (now Iraq) circa the 34th century BCE. Continue reading

Cases of syphilis are in dispute.

Archeological evidence shows that the disease was suffered by Native Americans many centuries before European contact, this has lead to the wide spread belief that the disease was transmitted to the rest of the world following the voyages of Christopher Columbus in 1492. Continue reading

Synthetic fibre called Rayon

Rayon, a synthetic fibre derived from cellulose was patented in 1884 by Count Louis-Marie-Hilaire Bernigaud de Chardonnet, who began producing it in a factory, commercially in 1892 at Besancon, France. Continue reading