Diving bell was known from antiquity

Alexander the Great’s descent in a diving bell built by Colimpha circa 330 BCE, is the first report, possibly apocryphal, of a diver submerging in a bell-shaped enclosure that contained a supply of air. But a more detailed account dating from the same period was contained in the book called Problemata (Problems, attributed to the Greek philosopher Aristotle but probably by one of his followers), in which an early diving bell is described: “They contrive a means of respiration for divers, by means of a container sent down to them; naturally the container is not filled with water, but air, which constantly assists the submerged man.”

Date:
      330 BCE
Name(s):
      Alexander the Great

Alexander the Great under water


Additional Information:

  • A Brief History of Diving: Free Divers, Bells and Helmets | Scuba …
    It may sound like strange preparation for someone in diving, but I was trained as a history teacher. And one of the things I learned was to value the contributions made by our predecessors in helping us become what and who we are today.
  • TITLE
    Beneath the surface of an ocean teeming with fish, King Alexander the Great sits in a bathysphere, a type of diving contraption, glowering as he raises his eyes to the couple above.
  • Alexander the Great and the bathysphere – Hellenica World
    Bathysphere. This reinforced spherical deep-sea chamber in which people are lowered by a cable to study the ocean and marine life was invented and named by American scientist and author William Beebee in 1930.
  • Alexander the Great – Wikipedia
    Alexander III of Macedon (20/21 July 356 BC – 10/11 June 323 BC), commonly known as Alexander the Great (Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος ὁ Μέγας, Aléxandros ho Mégas Koine Greek: [a.lék.san.dros ho mé.gas]), was a king (basileus) of the Ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon and a member of the Argead dynasty.

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