Formal attempt to define the nature of Jesus

A formal attempt was undertaken in 325 by a council of delegates from the various Christian churches, summoned and presided over by Roman Emperor Constantine, (though he was not yet a baptized convert), at Nicaea (now Iznik, Turkey), to define the nature of Jesus. The council adopted a creed, known as the Nicene Creed, that defined Jesus as “of one substance” with God, “God the Father and God the Son are consubstantial and coeternal” and that “Arianism the doctrine in which Jesus is a being created by and subservient to God, was heretical.”

Date:
      325 CE
Name(s):
      Constantine
Occupation:
      Roman Emperor
Location:
      Iznik, Turkey


Additional Information:

  • Constantine the Great – Wikipedia
    Constantine was the first Roman emperor to convert to Christianity, and he played an influential role in the proclamation of the Edict of Milan in 313, which declared religious tolerance for Christianity in the Roman empire.
  • Christology – Wikipedia
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  • Philosophy and Christian Theology (Stanford Encyclopedia of …
    May 13, 2002 – Those who attempt to understand the trinity primarily in terms of this ….. the threat of Nestorianism (the view, formally condemned by the Church, that … to explain their understanding of the nature and efficacy of Jesus’ work.
  • Historical Background of the Trinity – Christadelphia Home Page
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