Dam In Continuous Use

A rock-filled dam on the Orontes River in Syria, is thought to be dated from 1300 BCE, thus being a dam still in continuous use. Continue reading

Horace-Bénédict de Saussure

Horace-Bénédict de Saussure was born 17 February 1740, in Conches, near Geneva (today in Switzerland but then an independent republic), and died in Geneva 22 January 1799. Continue reading

Landslide Kills More Than 1,000 People

On September 4, 1618, a total of 2,240 villagers in Chiavenna, Italy, were buried alive by a Landslide. Continue reading

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz

Gottfried Wilhelm (von) Leibniz (/ˈlaɪbnɪts/;[5] German: [ˈɡɔtfʁiːt ˈvɪlhɛlm fɔn ˈlaɪbnɪts] or [ˈlaɪpnɪts]; French: Godefroi Guillaume Leibnitz; 1 July, 1646 [O.S. 21 June] – 14 November 1716) was a German polymath and philosopher who occupies a prominent place in the history of mathematics, the history of philosophy, having developed differential and integral calculus independently of Isaac Newton. Continue reading

First News Service Sent by Telegraph

Agence Havas of Paris, France established a wire news service that sent an item by telegraph in 1845. Continue reading

First Botanist was an Ancient Greek

Theophrastus of Eresus, Greek scientist and head of Peripatetic School of Philosophy is thought to be the first botanist from 322 BCE. Continue reading

The First international Advertising Agency

The Australian advertising agency of Gordon and Gotch, founded in Melbourne, Australia, in 1855. Continue reading

Santorio Santorio

Santorio Santorio (29 March 1561 – 22 February 1636), also called Sanctorio Sanctorio, Santorio Santorii, Sanctorius of Padua, Sanctorio Sanctorius and various combinations of these names, was a Venetian physiologist, physician, and professor, who introduced the quantitative approach into medicine. Continue reading

Woman Jockey in the Grand National

Charlotte Brew rode her own horse, Barony Fort at The Grand National which is held annually at Aintree, England in 1977. Brew became the first woman jockey in the Grand National steeplechase. Continue reading

New Testament Translated into English

The New Testament was translated into English by William Tyndale, an English humanist scholar on July 1525 while exiled in Cologne, Germany. Earlier translation were prevented by British Church authorities the German printing was suppressed by their Church officials until the second printing made at Worms and disseminated in 1526. Tyndale was arrested in Antwerp, Belgium while working on the Pentateuch then strangled and burned at the stake on October 6, 1536. There were 50,000 copies of the New Testament in circulation following his death.

Date:
      July, 1525, October 1536, 1526
Name(s):
      William Tyndale

Location:
      Antwerp, Belgium, Cologne, Germany


Additional Information:

  • Bible translations into English – Wikipedia
    Early Modern English Bible translations are of between about 1500 and 1800, the period of Early Modern English. This, the first major period of Bible translation into the English language, began with the introduction of the Tyndale Bible. The first complete edition of his New Testament was in 1526.
  • Tyndale Bible – Wikipedia
    Tyndale Bible. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. The beginning of the Gospel of John from a copy of the 1526 edition of William Tyndale’s New Testament at the British Library. The Tyndale Bible generally refers to the body of biblical translations by William Tyndale ( c. 1494–1536).
  • English Bible History: Timeline of how we got the English Bible
    The fascinating story of how we got the Bible in its present form actually starts thousands of years ago, as briefly outlined in our Timeline of Bible Translation …
  • From Wycliffe to King James (The Period of Challenge) | Bible.org
    Jul 6, 2004 – Until John Wycliffe translated the New Testament, only small portions of the Bible had been translated into English. The English language …
  • HISTORY OF BIBLE TRANSLATIONS
    Soon after the publication of Luther’s New Testament an English scholar, William Tyndale, is studying in Wittenberg – where he probably matriculates in May 1524. Tyndale begins a translation of the New Testament from Greek into English. His version is printed at Worms in 1526 in 3000 copies.