William Tyndale

William Tyndale (/ˈtɪndəl/; sometimes spelled Tynsdale, Tindall, Tindill, Tyndall; c. 1494 – c. 6 October 1536) was an English scholar who became a leading figure in the Protestant Reformation in the years leading up to his execution. He is well known for his translation of the Bible into English. He was influenced by the work of Desiderius Erasmus, who made the Greek New Testament available in Europe, and by Martin Luther. A number of partial translations had been made from the seventh century onward, but the spread of Wycliffe’s Bible in the late 14th century led to the death penalty for anyone found in unlicensed possession of Scripture in English, although translations were available in all other major European languages.
Tyndale’s translation was the first English Bible to draw directly from Hebrew and Greek texts, the first English translation to use Jehovah as God’s name as preferred by English Protestant Reformers, the first English translation to take advantage of the printing press, and first of the new English Bibles of the Reformation. It was taken to be a direct challenge to the hegemony of both the Roman Catholic Church and the laws of England maintaining the church’s position. In 1530, Tyndale also wrote The Practyse of Prelates, opposing Henry VIII’s annulment of his own marriage on the grounds that it contravened Scripture.

More info at: William Tyndale – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      William Tyndale
Birth:
      1494,
      Kingdom of England
Death:
      October 6, 1536,
      Duchy of Brabant
Cause of death:
      Executed by strangling, then burnt at the stake
Educations:
      Hertford College,
      University of Oxford,
      University of Cambridge,
      Magdalen College
Known for:
      Tyndale Bible


Additional Information:

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