Theophrastus of Eresus

Theophrastus (/ˌθiːəˈfræstəs/; Greek: Θεόφραστος Theόphrastos; c. 371 – c. 287 BC), a Greek native of Eresos in Lesbos, was the successor to Aristotle in the Peripatetic school. He came to Athens at a young age and initially studied in Plato’s school. After Plato’s death, he attached himself to Aristotle who took to Theophrastus his writings. When Aristotle fled Athens, Theophrastus took over as head of the Lyceum. Theophrastus presided over the Peripatetic school for thirty-six years, during which time the school flourished greatly. He is often considered the father of botany for his works on plants. After his death, the Athenians honoured him with a public funeral. His successor as head of the school was Strato of Lampsacus.

The interests of Theophrastus were wide ranging, extending from biology and physics to ethics and metaphysics. His two surviving botanical works, Enquiry into Plants (Historia Plantarum) and On the Causes of Plants, were an important influence on Renaissance science. There are also surviving works On Moral Characters, On Sensation, On Stones, and fragments on Physics and Metaphysics. In philosophy, he studied grammar and language and continued Aristotle’s work on logic. He also regarded space as the mere arrangement and position of bodies, time as an accident of motion, and motion as a necessary consequence of all activity.[citation needed] In ethics, he regarded happiness as depending on external influences as well as on virtue.

More info at: Theophrastus – Wikipedia

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  • Theophrastus – Wikipedia
    Theophrastus (/ˌθiːəˈfræstəs/; Greek: Θεόφραστος Theόphrastos; c. 371 – c. 287 BC[1]), a Greek native of Eresos in Lesbos,[2] was the successor to Aristotle in the Peripatetic school.
  • Theophrastus of Eresus. Sources for His Life, Writings, Thought and …
    These two volumes represent the first fruits of an international project to produce a new collection – text, translation and commentary – of the fragments and testimonia relating to Theophrastus (c. 370-288/5 B.C.), Aristotle’s pupil and successor as head of the Lyceum.
  • Theophrastus | Greek philosopher | Britannica.com
    Theophrastus, (born c. 372 bc, Eresus, Lesbos—died c. 287), Greek Peripatetic philosopher and pupil of Aristotle. He studied at Athens under Aristotle, and when Aristotle was forced to retire in 323 he became the head of the Lyceum, the academy in Athens founded by Aristotle.
  • The grandfather of botany – Theophrastus of Eresus | Kew
    What connection is there between Theophrastus of Eresus, one of the most important Pre-Linnaean botanists, and the library here at Kew? Now you can find out!
  • Theophrastus (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
    Theophrastus (c. 371–287 BCE) was a Peripatetic philosopher who was Aristotle’s close colleague and successor at the Lyceum. He wrote many treatises, in all areas of philosophy, in order to support, improve, expand, and develop the Aristotelian system.
  • Theophrastus | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
    Theophrastus was a Greek philosopher of the Peripatetic school, and immediate successor of Aristotle in leadership of the Lyceum. He was a native of Eresus in Lesbos, and studied philosophy at Athens, first under Plato and afterwards under Aristotle.
  • Theophrastus of Eresus – Dictionary definition of Theophrastus of …
    Theophrastus was a scientist and philosopher who made significant contributions to nearly every area of thought and science, and in particular the study of botany and ecology.

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