Commercially Manufactured Baby Carriages

William Cavendish, the third Duke of Devonshire’s family of Chatsworth, England owned the first baby carriage made in 1733 by William Kent. The first commercially manufactured baby carriages began in London, England in 1850.

Date:
      1733, 1850
Name(s):
      William Cavendish
Occupation:
      Duke
Location:
      Chatsworth, England

Additional Information:

  • The history of the stroller – from then to now – – Phil & Teds
    The stroller had its beginnings in the 1700’s. William Kent, a landscape architect designed the first stroller. It was created for the Duke of Devonshire to amuse his children while in transit. William’s baby carriages were considered luxury items and were used by wealthy families.Jul 19, 2017
  • The Evolution of the Stroller – Stroller Spotter
    In 1733, William Kent, a landscape architect, invented the first stroller so the third Duke of Devonshire could transport his little ones (and, more importantly, amuse them!). Dec 12, 2017
  • Baby transport – Wikipedia
    Jump to History – Benjamin Potter Crandall sold baby carriages in the US in the … have been described as the “first baby carriages manufactured in the …
  • Baby Carriage – History of Baby Carriage – SoftSchools
    Baby Carriage – History of Baby Carriage. … He founded the company Maclaren, which is still a popular maker of strollers and baby carriers in England. The first reversible buggy was patented by William H. Richardson in 1889. He designed it so that the child could face forward, or toward the person pushing the buggy.
  • FOR CARRIAGE TRADE, PRAMS JUST LIKE NEW – The New York …
    Mar 6, 1987 – ”These old prams are better made and much warmer than the new ones,” said Mrs. … But now there is a new demand for vintage baby carriages, which have … with eye appeal,” said Mr. Hampshire, the collector whose history,

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