Archeology Book Published, Nineveh and Its Remains

English archeologist Sir Austen Henry Layard published a book, Nineveh and Its Remains Continue reading

Invention of Slide Ruler

Englishman Robert Bissaker invented the slide ruler in 1654. Continue reading

Ibn Wahb al-Rasibi

ʿAbd Allāh (or ʿAbdullāh) ibn Wahb al-Rāsibī (died 17 July 658 AD) was an early leader of the Khārijites. Of the Bajīla tribe, he was a tābiʿī, one who learned the teachings of Islam directly from a ṣaḥāba (companion) of Muḥammad. He prostrated himself in prayer so frequently that he developed calluses on his forehead, leading to the nickname, dhu ʾl-thafināt, “the man with the calluses”.

ʿAbd Allāh fought under Ṣaʿd ibn Abī Waḳḳāṣ in the conquest of Iraq. In the first Muslim civil war, he took the side of the Caliph ʿAlī and fought for him at the Battle of Ṣiffīn (657). He opposed ʿAlī’s decision to accept arbitration to end the civil war and joined the dissidents, soon to be known as Khārijites, gathering at Ḥarūrāʾ in Iraq. They later moved to Kūfa, where they elected ʿAbd Allāh as their amīr (commander) and not, as is sometimes claimed, the true caliph (successor of Muḥammad). They marched out in March 658 and were routed by ʿAlī in the Battle of Nahrawān on 17 July (9 Ṣafar 38 AH). ʿAbd Allāh was killed in battle.

More info at: ‘Abd Allah ibn Wahb al-Rasibi – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Ibn Wahb al-Rasibi
Death:
      658 AD


Additional Information:

Italian Female Fresco Artist

Onorata Rodiani was the first female painter to create frescoes Continue reading

John Newbery

John Newbery (9 July 1713 – 22 December 1767), called “The Father of Children’s Literature”, was an English publisher of books who first made children’s literature a sustainable and profitable part of the literary market. He also supported and published the works of Christopher Smart, Oliver Goldsmith and Samuel Johnson. In recognition of his achievements the Newbery Medal was named after him in 1922.

By 1740 Newbery had started his publishing business in Reading. His first two publications were an edition of Richard Allestree’s The Whole Duty of Man and Miscellaneous Works Serious and Humerous [sic] In Verse and Prose. In 1743, Newbery left Reading, putting his stepson John Carnan in charge of his business there, and established a shop in London, first at the sign of the Bible and Crown near Devereux Court. He published several adult books, but became interested in expanding his business to children’s books. His first children’s book, A Little Pretty Pocket-Book, appeared 18 July 1744. :201 A Little Pretty Pocket-Book is the first in Newbery’s successful line of children’s books. The book cost six pence but for an extra two the purchaser received a red and black ball or pincushion. Newbery, like John Locke, believed that play was a better enticement to children’s good behaviour than physical discipline, and the child was to record their behaviour by either sticking a pin in the red side for good behaviour or the black side if they were bad. A Little Pretty Pocket-Book, though it would seem didactic today, was well received. Promising to “infallibly make Tommy a good boy and Polly a good girl”,:xiv it had poems, proverbs and an alphabet song. The book was child sized with a brightly coloured cover that appealed to children—something new in the publishing industry. Known as gift books, these early books became the precursor to the toy books popular in the nineteenth century. In developing his particular brand of children’s literature, Newbery borrowed techniques from other publishers, such as binding his books in Dutch floral paper and advertising his other products and books within the stories he wrote or commissioned This improvement in the quality of books for children, as well as the diversity of topics he published, helped make Newbery the leading producer of children’s books in his time.

More info at: John Newbery – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      John Newbery
Birth:
      July 9, 1713, Waltham St Lawrence, United Kingdom
Death:
      December 22, 1767, Canonbury, London, United Kingdom
Children:
      Francis Newbery


Additional Information:

Egyptians Created Toothpaste

Egyptians used toothpaste made of ground pumice stones mixed with wine vinegar circa 2000 BCE. Continue reading

First European Settlements in South America

Spanish explorer, Diego de Nicuesa founded the Nombre de Dios European settlement near Panama, South America settlement in 1510, Continue reading

World Croquet Championships

The first World Croquet Championships were held at the Hurlingham Club in London, England in 1989. Continue reading

Egyptian Combined Royalty Crowns

Upon the unification of Upper and Lower Egypt by Pharaoh Menes, the two crowns were combined both elements into a single crown in 3100 BCE. Continue reading

British Gentleman’s Club

Traditional Gentleman’s Club opens in London, England in 1413 known as La Court de Bonne Compagnie. Continue reading