Mary Anning

Mary Anning (21 May 1799 – 9 March 1847) was an English fossil collector, dealer, and palaeontologist who became known around the world for important finds she made in Jurassic marine fossil beds in the cliffs along the English Channel at Lyme Regis in the county of Dorset in Southwest England. Her findings contributed to important changes in scientific thinking about prehistoric life and the history of the Earth.

Anning searched for fossils in the area’s Blue Lias cliffs, particularly during the winter months when landslides exposed new fossils that had to be collected quickly before they were lost to the sea. She nearly died in 1833 during a landslide that killed her dog, Tray. Her discoveries included the first ichthyosaur skeleton correctly identified; the first two more complete plesiosaur skeletons found; the first pterosaur skeleton located outside Germany; and important fish fossils. Her observations played a key role in the discovery that coprolites, known as bezoar stones at the time, were fossilised faeces. She also discovered that belemnite fossils contained fossilised ink sacs like those of modern cephalopods. When geologist Henry De la Beche painted Duria Antiquior, the first widely circulated pictorial representation of a scene from prehistoric life derived from fossil reconstructions, he based it largely on fossils Anning had found, and sold prints of it for her benefit.

More info at: Mary Anning – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

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Name(s):
      Mary Anning
Occupation:
      Fossil collector, Palaeontologist
Birth:
      21 May 1799, Lyme Regis, Dorset, England
Death:
      9 March 1847, Lyme Regis, Dorset, England

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Additional Information:

  • Mary Anning – Wikipedia
    Mary Anning (21 May 1799 – 9 March 1847) was an English fossil collector, dealer, and palaeontologist who became known around the world for important finds she made in Jurassic marine fossil beds in the cliffs along the English Channel at Lyme Regis in the county of Dorset in Southwest England.
  • Mary Anning (1799-1847) – UCMP Berkeley
    Despite the fact that Mary Anning’s life has been made the subject of several books and articles, comparatively little is known about her life, and many people are …
  • Mary Anning: Lyme Regis Museum
    Mary Anning’s discoveries were some of the most significant geological finds of all time. They provided evidence that was central to the development of new …
  • Mary Anning | English fossil hunter and anatomist | Britannica
    Mary Anning, (born May 21, 1799, Lyme Regis, Dorset, Eng. —died March 9, 1847, Lyme Regis), prolific English fossil hunter and amateur anatomist credited with the discovery of several dinosaur specimens that assisted in the early development of paleontology.
  • Mary Anning – Fossil hunter – BBC Bitesize
    Mary Anning – Fossil hunter. Mary Anning was born on 21 May 1799. She lived in the English seaside town of Lyme Regis in Dorset. Her family were very poor, which meant she didn’t get to attend school much. Instead, she mainly taught herself to read and write.
  • Mary Anning, Finder of Fossils
    Mar 16, 2019 – Born poor and nonconformist, Mary Anning’s contributions to the birth of palaeontology had been forgotten. But not any longer
  • The untold tale of the woman who dug up ancient sea monsters
    Lived 1799 – 1847. Mary Anning was born into poverty, but became the greatest fossil finder of her era, powerfully influencing the new science of paleontology.
  • Mary Anning – Biography, Facts and Pictures – Famous Scientists
    Mar 9, 2018 – Mary was a pioneering palaeontologist and fossil collector. Her lifetime was a constellation of firsts.

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