Paul Ehrlich

Paul Ehrlich (German: [ˈpaʊ̯l ˈeːɐ̯lɪç] (About this soundlisten); 14 March 1854 – 20 August 1915) was a Nobel prize-winning German-Jewish physician and scientist who worked in the fields of hematology, immunology, and antimicrobial chemotherapy. He is credited with finding a cure for syphilis in 1909. He invented the precursor technique to Gram staining bacteria. The methods he developed for staining tissue made it possible to distinguish between different types of blood cells, which led to the capability to diagnose numerous blood diseases.

His laboratory discovered arsphenamine (Salvarsan), the first effective medicinal treatment for syphilis, thereby initiating and also naming the concept of chemotherapy. Ehrlich popularized the concept of a magic bullet. He also made a decisive contribution to the development of an antiserum to combat diphtheria and conceived a method for standardizing therapeutic serums.

In 1908, he received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his contributions to immunology. He was the founder and first director of what is now known as the Paul Ehrlich Institute.

More info at: Paul Ehrlich – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Paul Ehrlich
Birth:
      March 14, 1854, Strzelin, Poland
Death:
      August 20, 1915, Bad Homburg vor der Höhe, Germany
Spouse:
      Hedwig Pinkus (m. 1883–1915)
Children:
      Stephanie Ehrlich, Marianne Ehrlich
Known for:
      Chemotherapy, Immunology


Additional Information:

Mercury Used to Treat Syphilis Bacterium

German bacteriologist Paul Ehrlich developed the first anti-syphilis drug, arsphenamine (trade name Salvarsan), Continue reading

Contact Lenses… Nothing new

The contact lens were imagined and sketched his designs was the Italian artist and scientist Leonardo da Vinci, in 1508. Later in 1632 the French philosopher Rene Descartes conceived of corneal contact lens.

Date:
      1508 / 1632
Name(s):
      Leonardo da Vinci,
      Rene Descartes
Occupation:
      Artist,
      Inventor,
      Visionairy
      Philosopher

Additional Information:

  • Leonardo da Vinci – Wikipedia
    Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci (Italian: [leoˈnardo di ˌsɛr ˈpjɛːro da (v)ˈvintʃi] ( listen); 15 April 1452 – 2 May 1519), more commonly Leonardo da Vinci or simply Leonardo, was an Italian polymath whose areas of interest included invention, painting, sculpting, architecture, science, music, mathematics, engineering, literature, anatomy, geology, astronomy, botany, writing, history, and cartography.
  • Da Vinci to Disposable: A History of Contact Lenses – 1800contacts.com‎
    When you think about contact lenses, you probably don’t picture wearing a bowl of water on your head, but strangely enough, that’s how they began. In his 1508 “Codex of the Eye”, Italian inventor Leonardo da Vinci speculated that submerging the head in a bowl of water could alter vision.
  • When Were Contact Lenses Invented? – AllAboutVision.com
    Though contact lenses seem to be a recent phenomenon, the famous Italian architect, mathematician and inventor Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) produced the first known sketches (in 1508) that suggested the optics of the human eye could be altered by placing the cornea directly in contact with water.
  • A Brief History of Contact Lenses
    1508 Leonardo da Vinci illustrates the concept of contact lenses
  • Contact lens – Wikipedia
    A contact lens, or simply contact, is a thin lens placed directly on the surface of the eye. Contact lenses are considered medical devices and can be worn to correct vision, or for cosmetic or therapeutic reasons.
  • The Evolution of Contact Lenses: From Da Vinci to Electronic Lenses …
    As of 2012, there were 34 million Americans and 71 million people worldwide who wore the thin film inserts known as contact lenses over their eyes for some form of vision enhancement, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Blood types Discovered

Karl Landsteiner in 1901, described blood types A, B and O, fist shooing the differences due to distinctive antigens carried by red blood cells. Continue reading