Galileo Galilei Discovered Jupiter’s Moons

Galileo Galilei, Italian astronomer discovered Jupiter’s satellites by telescope then published in the book Siderius nuncius (The Starry Messenger), in 1610. Continue reading

Invention of the Mass Spectrometer

Joseph John Thomson invented the mass spectrometer or parabola spectrograph in Cambridge, England in 1913. Continue reading

Andromeda Galaxy Described in Ancient Poem

Roman nobleman, Rufus Festus Avienus initially described Andromeda Galaxy, M31 in his fourth century astronomical poem Continue reading

Mass Spectrometer Analyzes Neon

A mass spectrometer analyzed neon atoms and found the natural element was composed of two isotopes, neon 20 and 22 by Francis William Aston, Continue reading

Simon Marius

Simon Marius (Latinized from German Simon Mayr; January 20, 1573 – January 5, 1625) was a German astronomer. He was born in Gunzenhausen, near Nuremberg, but he spent most of his life in the city of Ansbach. He is most noted for making the first observations of the four largest moons of Jupiter, before Galileo himself, and his publication of his discovery led to charges of plagiarism. He is also known for the first European observation of the Andromeda Galaxy.

More info at: Simon Marius – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Simon Marius
Birth:
      January 20, 1573, Gunzenhausen, Germany
Death:
      January 5, 1625, Ansbach, Germany
Discovered:
      Europa, Ganymede
Known for:
      Jupiter, Andromeda Galaxy


Additional Information:

Vladimir Kosma Zworykin

Vladimir Kosmich Zworykin (Russian: Влади́мир Козьми́ч Зворы́кин, Vladimir Koz’mich Zvorykin; July 29 [O.S. July 17] 1888 – July 29, 1982)[1][2] was a Russian-born American inventor, engineer, and pioneer of television technology. Educated in Russia and in France, he spent most of his life in the United States. Zworykin invented a television transmitting and receiving system employing cathode ray tubes. He played a role in the practical development of television from the early thirties, including charge storage-type tubes, infrared image tubes and the electron microscope.[3]

More info at: Vladimir K. Zworykin – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Vladimir Kosma Zworykin
Birth:
      July 29, 1888, Murom, Russia
Death:
      July 29, 1982, Princeton, New Jersey, United States
Spouse:
      Katherine Polevitsky (m. 1951–1982)
Awards:
      IEEE Medal of Honor, IEEE Edison Medal
Books:
      Television: The Electronics of Image Transmission
Education:
      University of Pittsburgh, Saint-Petersburg State Institute of Technology


Additional Information:

Transmission Electron Microscope

Ernst August Friedrich Ruska, German physicist and electrical engineer developed a transmission electron microscope Continue reading

Galileo Galilei

Galileo Galilei (Italian: [ɡaliˈlɛːo ɡaliˈlɛi]; 15 February 1564 – 8 January 1642) was an Italian astronomer, physicist and engineer, sometimes described as a polymath. Galileo has been called the “father of observational astronomy”, the “father of modern physics”, the “father of the scientific method”, and the “father of modern science”.

Galileo studied speed and velocity, gravity and free fall, the principle of relativity, inertia, projectile motion and also worked in applied science and technology, describing the properties of pendulums and “hydrostatic balances”, inventing the thermoscope and various military compasses, and using the telescope for scientific observations of celestial objects. His contributions to observational astronomy include the telescopic confirmation of the phases of Venus, the observation of the four largest satellites of Jupiter, the observation of Saturn and the analysis of sunspots.

More info at: Galileo Galilei – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person's firsts:

Name(s):
      Galileo Galilei
Occupation:
      Astronomer, Physicist, Engineer, and sometimes described as a Polymath
Birth:
      February 15, 1564, Pisa, Italy
Death:
      January 8, 1642, Arcetri


Additional Information:

Gravity Experiment Proves Different Masses Fall the Same

Simon Stevin, Dutch engineer, inventor, and mathematician published results from a gravity experiment in 1586, whereby proving that objects with different masses fall at the same speed. Continue reading

Galileo Invented the Thermometer

Galileo Galilei, Italian physicist and astronomer invented the thermometer in 1592. Continue reading