Dutch Develop Compound Microscope

Various Dutch inventors developed the compound microscope with an objective and eyepiece between 1590 to 1608. Continue reading

Francis William Aston

Francis William Aston FRS (1 September 1877 – 20 November 1945) was an English chemist and physicist who won the 1922 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discovery, by means of his mass spectrograph, of isotopes, in a large number of non-radioactive elements, and for his enunciation of the whole number rule. He was a fellow of the Royal Society and Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge.

More info at: Francis William Aston – Wikipedia

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Name(s):
      Francis William Aston
Birth:
      September 1, 1877, Harborne, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Death:
      November 20, 1945, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Books:
      Mass Spectra and Isotopes, Isotopes
Siblings:
      Helen Aston, Mary Aston
Education:
      Mason Science College, University of Cambridge, Malvern College, Trinity College
Awards:
      Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Royal Medal, Hughes Medal


Additional Information:

Vladimir Kosma Zworykin

Vladimir Kosmich Zworykin (Russian: Влади́мир Козьми́ч Зворы́кин, Vladimir Koz’mich Zvorykin; July 29 [O.S. July 17] 1888 – July 29, 1982)[1][2] was a Russian-born American inventor, engineer, and pioneer of television technology. Educated in Russia and in France, he spent most of his life in the United States. Zworykin invented a television transmitting and receiving system employing cathode ray tubes. He played a role in the practical development of television from the early thirties, including charge storage-type tubes, infrared image tubes and the electron microscope.[3]

More info at: Vladimir K. Zworykin – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Vladimir Kosma Zworykin
Birth:
      July 29, 1888, Murom, Russia
Death:
      July 29, 1982, Princeton, New Jersey, United States
Spouse:
      Katherine Polevitsky (m. 1951–1982)
Awards:
      IEEE Medal of Honor, IEEE Edison Medal
Books:
      Television: The Electronics of Image Transmission
Education:
      University of Pittsburgh, Saint-Petersburg State Institute of Technology


Additional Information:

Galileo Galilei

Galileo Galilei (Italian: [ɡaliˈlɛːo ɡaliˈlɛi]; 15 February 1564 – 8 January 1642) was an Italian astronomer, physicist and engineer, sometimes described as a polymath. Galileo has been called the “father of observational astronomy”, the “father of modern physics”, the “father of the scientific method”, and the “father of modern science”.

Galileo studied speed and velocity, gravity and free fall, the principle of relativity, inertia, projectile motion and also worked in applied science and technology, describing the properties of pendulums and “hydrostatic balances”, inventing the thermoscope and various military compasses, and using the telescope for scientific observations of celestial objects. His contributions to observational astronomy include the telescopic confirmation of the phases of Venus, the observation of the four largest satellites of Jupiter, the observation of Saturn and the analysis of sunspots.

More info at: Galileo Galilei – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person's firsts:

Name(s):
      Galileo Galilei
Occupation:
      Astronomer, Physicist, Engineer, and sometimes described as a Polymath
Birth:
      February 15, 1564, Pisa, Italy
Death:
      January 8, 1642, Arcetri


Additional Information:

Adapted Clinical Thermometer Designed by Galileo

Santorio Santorio adapted the clinical thermometer based on Galileo Galilei’s design in 1612. Continue reading