Galileo Galilei

Galileo Galilei (Italian: [ɡaliˈlɛːo ɡaliˈlɛi]; 15 February 1564 – 8 January 1642) was an Italian astronomer, physicist and engineer, sometimes described as a polymath. Galileo has been called the “father of observational astronomy”, the “father of modern physics”, the “father of the scientific method”, and the “father of modern science”.

Galileo studied speed and velocity, gravity and free fall, the principle of relativity, inertia, projectile motion and also worked in applied science and technology, describing the properties of pendulums and “hydrostatic balances”, inventing the thermoscope and various military compasses, and using the telescope for scientific observations of celestial objects. His contributions to observational astronomy include the telescopic confirmation of the phases of Venus, the observation of the four largest satellites of Jupiter, the observation of Saturn and the analysis of sunspots.

More info at: Galileo Galilei – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person's firsts:

Name(s):
      Galileo Galilei
Occupation:
      Astronomer, Physicist, Engineer, and sometimes described as a Polymath
Birth:
      February 15, 1564, Pisa, Italy
Death:
      January 8, 1642, Arcetri


Additional Information:

Close-up photographs of Jupiter

The U.S.-built planetary probe Pioneer 10 satellite was launched on March 2, 1972, from Cape Canaveral, FL, USA. Then on December 3, 1973, as Pioneer 10 passed Jupiter, it took Close-up photographs of of the giant planet. Continue reading

The Spacecraft to reach another planet

The Soviet planetary probe Venera 3, which crash-landed on Venus on March 1, 1966, became the first Spacecraft to reach another planet. Continue reading

Mars probe called Mars 1

After a series of failures, Mars 1, successfully launched from the USSR’s Baikonur space centre in Kazakhstan on November 1, 1962. Continue reading

Discovery that Uranus has rings

On March 10th 1977, when Uranus passed between a star and the earth, we discovery that Uranus has rings. Continue reading