Internal-combustion engine now in fire trucks

Waterous Fire Engine Works created and introduced circa 1900, a fire truck that had an internal-combustable engine, that not only drove the truck, but also powered the water pumps.

Date: circa 1900
Location: St. Paul, MN, USA
Manufacturer: Waterous Fire Engine Works


Additional Information:

  • HISTORY OF FIRETRUCKS (page disappeared on web, recovered via WayBackMachine)
    There are many facts about a huge machine that fights fires. It’s called the firetruck,and here’s its story. The first firetruck which was invented in the early 1720’s, had a waterpump, handpumps, and reservoirs.
  • Weird Fire Facts: From the first built… – City of Manistee Fire …
    From the first built firehouse in 1640 to the modern firehouse of today,many things have changed. The early firehouses were really just big tool sheds which held all the bulky equipment.
  • Fire engine – Wikipedia
    A fire engine (also known in some territories as a fire apparatus, fire truck, or fire appliance) is a vehicle designed primarily for firefighting operations. In addition, many fire departments/fire services often employ their vehicles for various other uses including emergency medical services and rescue purposes.
  • Fire Truck History – autoevolution
    The lights, the sirens and the cascade of water, attributes of the modern day fire truck, have a tendency to hide the real role of this type of vehicles, that to save lives.
  • History of Fire Apparatus – Southern Fire Service & Sales
    Sirens blare as a fire truck pulls around the corner. Firefighters quickly hop out of the vehicle and work to attach the truck’s hose to the nearest fire hydrant. This is the image that comes to the mind of just about everyone when it comes to how fires are handled.

Electric Arc Furnace Invented

Paul-Louis Toussaint Heroult created the Electric Arc Furnace (Heated by a carbon arc at very high temp.) in France. At first it was used to melt scrap iron, then later in the Hall-Heroult process, the electrolytic refinement process of aluminum.

Date: 1900
Name(s): Paul-Louis Toussaint Heroult
Occupation: French Metallurgist
Location: France


Additional Information:

  • Electric arc furnace – Wikipedia
    ndustrial arc furnaces range in size from small units of approximately one ton capacity (used in foundries for producing cast iron products) up to about 400 ton units used for secondary steelmaking.
  • When was the electric arc furnace invented?
    The German-born British inventor Sir William Siemens first demonstrated the arc furnace in 1879 at the Paris Exposition by melting iron in crucibles. In this furnace, horizontally placed carbon electrodes produced an electric arc above the container of metal.
  • What does electric arc furnace do?
    Steel scrap (or other ferrous material) is first tipped into the EAF from an overhead crane. A lid is then swung into position over the furnace. This lid contains electrodes which are lowered into the furnace. An electric current is passed through the electrodes to form an arc.
  • Steel History From Iron Age to Electric Arc Furnaces – The Balance
    The development of steel can be traced back 4000 years to the beginning of the Iron Age. Proving to be harder and stronger than bronze, which had previously been the most widely used metal, iron began to displace bronze in weaponry and tools.
  • Electric Arc Furnace | Industrial Efficiency Technology & Measures
    Electric Arc Furnaces (EAFs) are a central part of the production route that is an alternative to the dominant BF-BOF route. EAFs are used to produce carbon steels and alloy steels primarily by recycling ferrous scrap.

The Cultivation of the Avocado

Avocado comes from the Aztec word “ahuactal” or “Tree Testicle”. Now thats a funny translation of the word Avocado. George’s goal was to produce an avocado tree that could produce fruit that was uniform in size and shape.

Date: Circa 1900
Name(s): George Cullen
Occupation: American horticulturist
Location: Florida, USA


Additional Information:

  • Avocado – Wikipedia
    The avocado tree does not tolerate freezing temperatures, and can be grown only in subtropical or tropical climates. Several cold-hardy varieties are planted in the region of Gainesville, Florida, which survive temperatures as low as −6.5 °C (20 °F) with only minor leaf damage.
  • Learn How To Grow Your Own Avocado Tree from Seed
    Wash it. Use 3 toothpicks to suspend it broad-end down over a water-filled glass to cover about an inch of the seed. Put the glass in a warm place out of direct sunlight and replenish water as needed. You should see the roots and stem start to sprout in about 2-6 weeks.
  • Avocado Fruit Farming Information Guide | Agrifarming.in
    The Slow Spread of the Avocado. … Sir Hans Sloane, an Irish naturalist, is believed to have coined the word “avocado” in 1696, when he mentioned the plant in a catalogue of Jamaican plants. He also called it the “alligator pear-tree.” Henry Perrine, a horticulturist, first planted avocados in Florida in 1833.
  • A Brief History of the Avocado – AvoSeedo
    The word “avocado” is believed to be derived from the Nahuatl word ahuacatl, which means “testicle” and obviously describes the shape of the fruit. It also likely refers to the fact that the believed the avocado to be an aphrodisiac.
  • Avocado Origins: A Brief History of Avocado – CureJoy
    Though discovered by the Spanish only in the 15th century, avocado was used by the Mesoamericans since 5000 BC. This aphrodisiac fruit from south Central Mexico was used by the Incas in Peru and sold in Mexican markets.

Sarah Bernhardt

Sarah Bernhardt (French: [sa.ʁa bɛʁ.nɑʁt]; 22 or 23 October 1844 – 26 March 1923) was a French stage actress who starred in some of the most popular French plays of the late 19th and early 20th century, including La Dame Aux Camelias by Alexandre Dumas, fils, Ruy Blas by Victor Hugo, Fédora and La Tosca by Victorien Sardou, and L’Aiglon by Edmond Rostand. She also played male roles, including Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Continue reading

Jacques Yves Cousteau

Jacques-Yves Cousteau AC (French: [ʒak iv kusto]; commonly known in English as Jacques Cousteau; 11 June 1910 – 25 June 1997) was a French naval officer, explorer, conservationist, filmmaker, innovator, scientist, photographer, author and researcher who studied the sea and all forms of life in water. Continue reading

International Congress of Comparative Law met in Paris, France

Those who attended the International Congress of Comparative Law in Paris, France, in 1900, proposed an international law code to be used by national legislatures. Since then a general code of international law has yet been implemented. The laws are very slow to change. Continue reading

First Woman Athlete to win an Olympic Medal

Charlotte Cooper was an English tennis champion who won the woman’s singles lawn tennis competition at the 1900 Olympic Games. Continue reading

International Dentistry association was founded in Paris, France

In Paris, France, at the 3rd International Dentistry Conference, the International Dentistry Federation (Federation Dentaire Internationale) was founded. Continue reading

10 year old boy wins Gold at the Olympic Games

At the Paris, France Olympic Games a 10 year old boy was substituted for an adult in the Coxswain position due to his lighter weight. Continue reading

First Prime Minister of Australia

Once Australia became part of the commonwealth, Edmund Barton, leader of the Australian federal movement became Prime Minister in 1900 and served until 1903. Continue reading