Wilbur Wright Performs Aerial Turns

Wilbur Wright performed aerial turns in an airplane on September 20, 1904 at Kitty Hawk, NC, USA. Continue reading

Orville Wright’s First Powered Flight

Orville Wright flew a motor-powered airplane on December 17, 1903, at Kill Devil Hills, near Kitty Hawk, NC, USA Continue reading

Samuel Pierpont Langley

Title: Samuel Pierpont Langley

Samuel Pierpont Langley (August 22, 1834 – February 27, 1906) was an American astronomer, physicist, inventor of the bolometer and aviation pioneer.

He attended Boston Latin School, graduated from English High School of Boston, was an assistant in the Harvard College Observatory, then moved to a job ostensibly as a professor of mathematics at the United States Naval Academy, but actually was sent there to restore the Academy’s small observatory. In 1867, he became the director of the Allegheny Observatory and a professor of astronomy at the Western University of Pennsylvania, now known as the University of Pittsburgh, a post he kept until 1891 even while he became the third Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution in 1887. Langley was the founder of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. In 1888 Langley was elected a member of the American Antiquarian Society. In 1898, he received the Prix Jules Janssen, the highest award of the Société astronomique de France, the French astronomical society.

More info at: Samuel Pierpont Langley – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Samuel Pierpont Langley
Birth:
      August 22, 1834, Roxbury, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Death:
      February 27, 1906, Aiken, South Carolina, United States
Known for:
      Solar physics
Education:
      The English High School,
      Boston Latin School,
      Boston High School
Awards:
      Rumford Medal,
      Henry Draper Medal,
      Rumford Prize,
      John Scott Legacy Medal and Premium


Additional Information:

Samuel Pierpont Langley Propelled a Steam Engine Plane

Samuel Pierpont Langley propelled a steam engine plane, Aerodrome across the Potomac River near Washington, DC, USA, on May 6, 1896. Continue reading

American Built Radial Aviation Engine

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First Female Jet Plane Pilot

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First Transoceanic Flight by Deutsche Lufthansa AG

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First Transoceanic Jetliner Service

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First Amphibious Aircraft Built

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Antony Jannus

Antony Habersack Jannus, more familiarly known as Tony Jannus (July 22, 1889 – October 12, 1916), was an early American pilot whose aerial exploits were widely publicized in aviation’s pre-World War I period. He flew the first airplane from which a parachute jump was made, in 1912. Jannus was also the first airline pilot, having pioneered the inaugural flight of the St. Petersburg–Tampa Airboat Line on January 1, 1914, the first scheduled commercial airline flight in the world using heavier-than-air aircraft. The Tony Jannus Award, created to perpetuate his legacy, recognizes outstanding individual achievement in the scheduled commercial aviation industry and is conferred annually by the Tony Jannus Distinguished Aviation Society founded in Tampa, Florida, in 1963.
More info at: Tony Jannus – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Antony Habersack Jannus
Occupation:
      American pilot
Birth:
      July 22, 1889, Washington, D.C.
Death:
      October 12, 1916, Black Sea
Educations:
      McKinley Technology High School


Additional Information: