First Poker Rule Book

Robert C. Schenck, U.S. minister to Great Britain authored the first poker rule book Continue reading

Austen Henry Layard

Sir Austen Henry Layard GCB PC (/lɛərd/; 5 March 1817 – 5 July 1894) was an English traveller, archaeologist, cuneiformist, art historian, draughtsman, collector, politician and diplomat. He is best known as the excavator of Nimrud and of Nineveh, where he uncovered a large proportion of the Assyrian palace reliefs known, and in 1851 the library of Ashurbanipal.

More info at: Austen Henry Layard – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Austen Henry Layard
Birth:
      March 5, 1817, Paris, France
Death:
      July 5, 1894, London, United Kingdom
Place of burial:
      England, United Kingdom


Additional Information:

  • Austen Henry Layard – Wikipedia
    Sir Austen Henry Layard GCB PC was an English traveller, archaeologist, cuneiformist, art historian, draughtsman, collector, politician and diplomat. He is best …
  • Sir Austen Henry Layard | British archaeologist | Britannica.com
    Sir Austen Henry Layard, (born March 5, 1817, Paris—died July 5, 1894, London), English archaeologist whose excavations greatly increased knowledge of the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia. … In 1842 the British ambassador at Istanbul, Sir Stratford Canning, employed him for …
  • Austen Henry Layard – New World Encyclopedia
    Jun 29, 2019 – Austen Henry Layard (March 5, 1817 – July 5, 1894) was a British amateur archaeologist, cuneiformist, art historian, collector, author, and diplomat. He is best known as the excavator of Nimrud, the ancient Assyrian city located on the River Tigris, south of Mosul in what is now Iraq.
  • Gilgamesh, Nineveh, and Sir Austen Henry Layard
    Gilgamesh, Nineveh, and Sir Austen Henry Layard – Follow the travels of Austen Henry Layard. What were his major discoveries? What impact has he made on …
  • Austen Henry Layard and the early exploration of Nimrud …
    May 7, 2015 – The first excavation at Nimrud was undertaken in 1845 by a French-born Englishman named Austen Henry Layard.[1] Layard, whose uncle had …
  • Austen Henry Layard – Wikiquote
    Sir Austen Henry Layard (5 March 1817 – 5 July 1894) was a British traveler, archaeologist, cuneiformist, art historian, draughtsman, collector, author and …
  • The men who uncovered Assyria – BBC News
    Mar 22, 2015 – But in 1845, when Rassam was 19 years old, he met someone who changed the trajectory of his life – Austen Henry Layard. Layard was an …
  • Layard at Nimrud – World Archaeology
    On an overland ride from England to Ceylon in 1839, Austen Henry Layard became fascinated…

Archeology Book Published, Nineveh and Its Remains

English archeologist Sir Austen Henry Layard published a book, Nineveh and Its Remains Continue reading

John Newbery

John Newbery (9 July 1713 – 22 December 1767), called “The Father of Children’s Literature”, was an English publisher of books who first made children’s literature a sustainable and profitable part of the literary market. He also supported and published the works of Christopher Smart, Oliver Goldsmith and Samuel Johnson. In recognition of his achievements the Newbery Medal was named after him in 1922.

By 1740 Newbery had started his publishing business in Reading. His first two publications were an edition of Richard Allestree’s The Whole Duty of Man and Miscellaneous Works Serious and Humerous [sic] In Verse and Prose. In 1743, Newbery left Reading, putting his stepson John Carnan in charge of his business there, and established a shop in London, first at the sign of the Bible and Crown near Devereux Court. He published several adult books, but became interested in expanding his business to children’s books. His first children’s book, A Little Pretty Pocket-Book, appeared 18 July 1744. :201 A Little Pretty Pocket-Book is the first in Newbery’s successful line of children’s books. The book cost six pence but for an extra two the purchaser received a red and black ball or pincushion. Newbery, like John Locke, believed that play was a better enticement to children’s good behaviour than physical discipline, and the child was to record their behaviour by either sticking a pin in the red side for good behaviour or the black side if they were bad. A Little Pretty Pocket-Book, though it would seem didactic today, was well received. Promising to “infallibly make Tommy a good boy and Polly a good girl”,:xiv it had poems, proverbs and an alphabet song. The book was child sized with a brightly coloured cover that appealed to children—something new in the publishing industry. Known as gift books, these early books became the precursor to the toy books popular in the nineteenth century. In developing his particular brand of children’s literature, Newbery borrowed techniques from other publishers, such as binding his books in Dutch floral paper and advertising his other products and books within the stories he wrote or commissioned This improvement in the quality of books for children, as well as the diversity of topics he published, helped make Newbery the leading producer of children’s books in his time.

More info at: John Newbery – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      John Newbery
Birth:
      July 9, 1713, Waltham St Lawrence, United Kingdom
Death:
      December 22, 1767, Canonbury, London, United Kingdom
Children:
      Francis Newbery


Additional Information:

Guru Arjan

Guru Arjan (Punjabi: ਗੁਰੂ ਅਰਜੁਨ Guru Arjan [ɡʊru əɾdʒən]) 15 April 1563 – 30 May 1606) was the first of the two Gurus martyred in the Sikh faith and the fifth of the ten total Sikh Gurus. He compiled the first official edition of the Sikh scripture called the Adi Granth, which later expanded into the Guru Granth Sahib.

He was born in Goindval, in the Punjab, the youngest son of Bhai Jetha, who later became Guru Ram Das, and Mata Bhani, the daughter of Guru Amar Das. He was the first Guru in Sikhism to be born into a Sikh family. Guru Arjan led Sikhism for a quarter of a century. He completed the construction of Darbar Sahib at Amritsar, after the fourth Sikh Guru founded the town and built a pool. Guru Arjan compiled the hymns of previous Gurus and of other saints into Adi Granth, the first edition of the Sikh scripture, and installed it in the Harimandir Sahib.

More info at: Guru Arjan – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Guru Arjan
Birth:
      April 15, 1563, Goindval, India
Death:
      May 30, 1606, Lahore, Pakistan
Spouse:
      Mata Ganga
Children:
      Guru Hargobind


Additional Information:

Mother Goose Nursery Rhymes

First publishing of Mother Goose nursery rhymes, Mother Goose's Melody: or Sonnets for the Cradle, was published in London, England, in 1781 by Continue reading

First Children’s Fiction Book Published

John Newbery published a children's fiction book, The History of Little Goody Two-Shoes; or, Continue reading

First Sikh Book Compilation

Arjun, the fifth Sikh guru compiled the Sikh sacred book Adi Granth or Granth Sahib in 1604. Continue reading

Archeologists Find Earliest Vocabulary List

Archeologists discovered an Akkadian vocabulary list in Mesopotamia from 600 BCE. Continue reading

Bernardino Ramazzini

Bernardino Ramazzini (4 October 1633 – 5 November 1714) was an Italian physician. (Italian pronunciation: [bernarˈdino ramats’tsini]). Ramazzini, along with Francesco Torti, was an early proponent of the use of cinchona bark (from which quinine is derived) in the treatment of Malaria. His most important contribution to medicine was his book on occupational diseases, De Morbis Artificum Diatriba (“Diseases of Workers”).

More info at: Bernardino Ramazzini – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Bernardino Ramazzini
Occupation:
      Physician
Birth:
      October 4, 1633, Carpi, Italy
Death:
      November 5, 1714, Padua, Italy
Educations:
      University of Parma


Additional Information: