Blaise Pascal

Blaise Pascal (/pæˈskæl, pɑːˈskɑːl/; French: [blɛz paskal]; 19 June 1623 – 19 August 1662) was a French mathematician, physicist, inventor, writer and Catholic theologian. He was a child prodigy who was educated by his father, a tax collector in Rouen. Pascal’s earliest work was in the natural and applied sciences where he made important contributions to the study of fluids, and clarified the concepts of pressure and vacuum by generalising the work of Evangelista Torricelli. Pascal also wrote in defence of the scientific method.

In 1642, while still a teenager, he started some pioneering work on calculating machines. After three years of effort and 50 prototypes, he built 20 finished machines (called Pascal’s calculators and later Pascalines) over the following 10 years, establishing him as one of the first two inventors of the mechanical calculator.

More info at: Blaise Pascal – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Blaise Pascal
Occupation:
      Mathematician, Physicist, Inventor, Writer and Catholic Theologian
Birth:
      June 19, 1623, Clermont-Ferrand, France
Death:
      August 19, 1662, Paris, France


Additional Information:

Pascaline was the First Practical Adding Machine

The first practical adding machine, the Pascaline was invented by Blaise Pascal, a French philosopher, mathematician, and scientist in 1642. Continue reading

Whole Number Factored by Automatic Calculator

The discovery of the device was at the Observatoire du Bordeaux, located in Floirac, France, it was found, (hidden away for some 50 years) by the following people in 1993:

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