Callimachus of Cyrene

Callimachus (/kæˈlɪməkəs/; Greek: Καλλίμαχος, Kallimakhos; 310/305–240 BC) was a native of the Greek colony of Cyrene, Libya. He was a poet, critic and scholar at the Library of Alexandria and enjoyed the patronage of the Egyptian–Greek Pharaohs Ptolemy II Philadelphus and Ptolemy III Euergetes. Although, he was never made chief librarian, he was responsible for producing a bibliographic survey based upon the contents of the Library. This, his Pinakes, 120 volumes long, provided the foundation for later work on the history of ancient Greek literature. He is among the most productive and influential scholar-poets of the Hellenistic age.

More info at: Callimachus – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Callimachus
Occupation:
      Poet, Critic and Scholar
Birth:
      310 BC, Cyrene
Death:
      240 BC, Alexandria, Egypt


Additional Information:

Egyptian Tomb Painting Display an Animal Yoke

Egyptian tomb paintings depict a yoke animal harness dating back to 2000 BCE. The yoke was a rope tied to the horns of oxen.

Date:
      2000 BCE
Location:
      Egypt


Additional Information:

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