John Bardeen

John Bardeen (/bɑːrˈdiːn/; May 23, 1908 – January 30, 1991) was an American physicist and electrical engineer, the only person to have won the Nobel Prize in Physics twice: first in 1956 with William Shockley and Walter Brattain for the invention of the transistor; and again in 1972 with Leon N Cooper and John Robert Schrieffer for a fundamental theory of conventional superconductivity known as the BCS theory. Continue reading

Bell Telephone Laboratories invents the Transistor and changed the world

At the Bell Telephone Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ, USA, the first demonstration of a transistor took place on June 30th 1948. Continue reading

The first tape recorder was the Blattnerphone

Blattnerphone was a Tape recorder developed by the German film producer Louis Blattner in 1929. Continue reading

Transistor portable television

The Sony Corporation, a consumer electronics firm founded in Tokyo, Japan, in 1946 by Masaru Ibuka and Akio Morita, introduced in 1960, an All-transistor portable television was a small set with an 8-inch screen (20cm)
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Game Boy

In 1989, the Nintendo Company Ltd., Japan, introduced a handheld video game called the Game Boy. Continue reading

Ultraviolet solid-state laser

In late 1993 the Sony KK of Tokyo, Japan, announced they developed an Ultraviolet solid-state laser, capable of generated a continuous 1-watt wave beam at a 266 nano-meters wavelength. Continue reading