William Franklin Sends First Airmail Letter

William Franklin,sent the first airmail letter to his father, Benjamin Franklin on January 7, 1785 while stationed in Europe at the Continental Congress. Continue reading

David Low

Sir David Alexander Cecil Low (7 April 1891 – 19 September 1963) was a New Zealand political cartoonist and caricaturist who lived and worked in the United Kingdom for many years. Low was a self-taught cartoonist. Born in New Zealand, he worked in his native country before migrating to Sydney in 1911, and ultimately to London (1919), where he made his career and earned fame for his Colonel Blimp depictions and his merciless satirising of the personalities and policies of German dictator Adolf Hitler, Italian dictator Benito Mussolini, Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin, and other leaders of his times.

Low was born and educated in New Zealand. His first work was published when he was only 11 years old. His professional career began at The Canterbury Times in 1910. The following year he moved to Australia and worked for The Bulletin. His work attracted the attention of Henry Cadbury, the part owner of The Star, and Low moved to London in 1919, working for that paper until 1927, when he moved to the Evening Standard. There he produced his most famous work, chronicling the rise of fascism in the 1930s, the policy of Appeasement, and the conflict of World War II. His stinging depictions of Hitler and Mussolini led to his work being banned in Italy and Germany, and his being named in The Black Book.

More info at: David Low (cartoonist) – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      David Low
Occupation:
      Cartoonist
Birth:
      April 7, 1891
      Dunedin, New Zealand
Death:
      September 19, 1963
      Kensington, London, United Kingdom
Spouse:
      Madeline Grieve Kenning
      (m. 1920–1963)
Children:
      Rachael Low
Education:
      Christchurch Boys’ High School


Additional Information:

David Low was First Chiropodist

British corn-cutter, David Low termed the word “chiropodist” in his textbook Chiropodologia in 1785. Continue reading

Hot Air Balloon Uses Flight Instruments

John Jeffries, an American balloonist carried a flight instrument, a barometer during his voyage over London, England in 1784. Continue reading

British Invented the Diving Suit

Englishman, John Lethbridge invented the first diving suit in 1715. Continue reading

Women Traders at London Stock Exchange

The London Stock Exchange first allowed women on the trading floor in 1973. Continue reading

Robert de Boron

Robert de Boron (also spelled in the manuscripts “Bouron”, “Beron”) was a French poet of the late 12th and early 13th centuries who is most notable as the author of the poems Joseph d’Arimathe and Merlin. Though little is known about him outside of the poems he allegedly wrote, his works and their subsequent prose redactions impacted later incarnations of the Arthurian legend and its prose cycles, particularly due to his Christian backstory for the Holy Grail, originally an element of Chrétien de Troyes’s famously-unfinished Perceval.

More info at: Robert de Boron – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Robert de Boron
Occupation:
      French poet
Birth:
      Boron, Territoire de Belfort, France


Additional Information:

Lowe’s Grand Hotel

The first family hotel, Lowe’s Grand Hotel opened on King Street, Covent Garden, London, England on January 1774 by David Low. Continue reading

Invention of the Power Loom

Edmund Cartwright, English clergyman and inventor developed the power loom in 1784 and patented the idea in 1785. Continue reading

Poetic Tales of Joseph of Arimathea

There are many tales of Joseph of Arimathea, keeper of the Holy Grail a Samarian who Jesus entrusted with the cup used at the Last Supper. Continue reading