St. Fabiola

Saint Fabiola was a nurse (physician) and Roman matron of rank of the company of noble Roman women who, under the influence of the Church father St. Jerome gave up all earthly pleasures and devoted themselves to the practice of Christian asceticism and charitable work.[1]

More info at: Saint Fabiola – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      St. Fabiola
Birth:
      Rome, Italy
Death:
      December 27, 399 AD, Rome, Italy
Feast:
      27 December
Canonized:
      Pre-Congregation


Additional Information:

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