Europeans Controls Leprosy

Europe brought leprosy, a disfiguring contagious disease caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium leprae, under control in the 14th century. Continue reading

First Public Photography Studio Opens

Richard Beard and chemist John Frederick Goddard open the first European public photography studio on the Royal Polytechnic Institute’s roof Continue reading

Plague of Antoninus Epidemic Spreads Across Europe

The worst European smallpox epidemic was the Plague of Antoninus Continue reading

St. Fabiola

Saint Fabiola was a nurse (physician) and Roman matron of rank of the company of noble Roman women who, under the influence of the Church father St. Jerome gave up all earthly pleasures and devoted themselves to the practice of Christian asceticism and charitable work. Continue reading

Italy Opens First Public Hospital

Christian convert St. Fabiola, founded the first public hospital in Rome Italy in 396 Continue reading

Johannes Gutenberg

Johannes Gensfleisch zur Laden zum Gutenberg (/ˈɡuːtənbɜːrɡ/;[1] c. 1400 – February 3, 1468) was a German blacksmith, goldsmith, inventor, printer, and publisher who introduced printing to Europe with the printing press. Continue reading

First Printed Complete Gutenberg Bible Survives

The first printed book in Europe to survive in its complete form was the Gutenberg Bible, also known as the Mazarin Bible (first copy part of Cardinal Mazarin of France’s library). Continue reading

Papal Indulgence Printed in Germany

A printed papal indulgence authorized by Pope Nicholas V was printed in 1454 at Mainz, Germany. Continue reading

German Religious Poem “World Judgement” Printed in Europe

A book printed in Europe contained a copy of a German religious poem ‘World Judgement’ on Johannes Gutenberg’s experimental printing press between 1444 to 1447 in Strassburg, Germany. Continue reading

European Sugar Mill

Pietro Speciale of Sicily in 1449, invented the sugar mill. Continue reading