Pope Gregory IX

Pope Gregory IX (Latin: Gregorius IX; born Ugolino di Conti; c. 1145 or before 1170 – 22 August 1241) was Pope from 19 March 1227 to his death in 1241. He is known for issuing the Decretales and instituting the Papal Inquisition in response to the failures of the episcopal inquisitions established during the time of Pope Lucius III through his papal bull Ad abolendam issued in 1184.

The successor of Pope Honorius III, he fully inherited the traditions of Pope Gregory VII and of his cousin Pope Innocent III and zealously continued their policy of Papal supremacy.

More info at: Pope Gregory IX – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Pope Gregory IX
Occupation:
      Pope
Birth:
      1145, Anagni, Italy
Death:
      August 22, 1241, Rome, Italy
Papacy ended:
      22 August 1241


Additional Information:

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John Jeffries

John Jeffries (5 February 1745 – 16 September 1819) was a Boston physician, scientist, and a military surgeon with the British Army in Nova Scotia and New York during the American Revolution. He is best known for accompanying Jean-Pierre Blanchard on his 1785 balloon flight across the English Channel.

Jeffries is credited with being among America’s first weather observers. He began taking daily weather measurements in 1774 in Boston, as well as taking weather observations in a balloon over London in 1784. National Weatherperson’s Day is celebrated in his honor on 5 February, his birthday. The Archives and Special Collections at Amherst College holds a collection of his papers, including a letter he dropped from the balloon during his historic flight, considered the oldest piece of airmail in existence.

More info at: John Jeffries – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      John Jeffries
Occupation:
      Physician
     Surgeon
Birth:
      February 5, 1745
Boston, MA, USA
Death:
      September 16, 1819
      Boston, MA, USA
Spouse:
      Hannah Jeffries
(m. 1787)
Known for:
      The Balloon
Education:
      Harvard College (1763),
      University of Aberdeen,
      Harvard College,
      Harvard University


Additional Information: