First Printed Playing Cards

German documents reference wooden blocks used to print picture playing cards Continue reading

Paul Ehrlich

Paul Ehrlich (German: [ˈpaʊ̯l ˈeːɐ̯lɪç] (About this soundlisten); 14 March 1854 – 20 August 1915) was a Nobel prize-winning German-Jewish physician and scientist who worked in the fields of hematology, immunology, and antimicrobial chemotherapy. He is credited with finding a cure for syphilis in 1909. He invented the precursor technique to Gram staining bacteria. The methods he developed for staining tissue made it possible to distinguish between different types of blood cells, which led to the capability to diagnose numerous blood diseases.

His laboratory discovered arsphenamine (Salvarsan), the first effective medicinal treatment for syphilis, thereby initiating and also naming the concept of chemotherapy. Ehrlich popularized the concept of a magic bullet. He also made a decisive contribution to the development of an antiserum to combat diphtheria and conceived a method for standardizing therapeutic serums.

In 1908, he received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his contributions to immunology. He was the founder and first director of what is now known as the Paul Ehrlich Institute.

More info at: Paul Ehrlich – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Paul Ehrlich
Birth:
      March 14, 1854, Strzelin, Poland
Death:
      August 20, 1915, Bad Homburg vor der Höhe, Germany
Spouse:
      Hedwig Pinkus (m. 1883–1915)
Children:
      Stephanie Ehrlich, Marianne Ehrlich
Known for:
      Chemotherapy, Immunology


Additional Information:

First Synthetic Drug Marketed

German bacteriologist Paul Ehrlich developed Salvarsan that attacks Treponema pallidum, Continue reading

Mercury Used to Treat Syphilis Bacterium

German bacteriologist Paul Ehrlich developed the first anti-syphilis drug, arsphenamine (trade name Salvarsan), Continue reading

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Simon Marius

Simon Marius (Latinized from German Simon Mayr; January 20, 1573 – January 5, 1625) was a German astronomer. He was born in Gunzenhausen, near Nuremberg, but he spent most of his life in the city of Ansbach. He is most noted for making the first observations of the four largest moons of Jupiter, before Galileo himself, and his publication of his discovery led to charges of plagiarism. He is also known for the first European observation of the Andromeda Galaxy.

More info at: Simon Marius – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Simon Marius
Birth:
      January 20, 1573, Gunzenhausen, Germany
Death:
      January 5, 1625, Ansbach, Germany
Discovered:
      Europa, Ganymede
Known for:
      Jupiter, Andromeda Galaxy


Additional Information: