British Law Code Written in Prose

King Aethelberht I of Kent, England wrote the law code in prose style in 600. Continue reading

Sumerians Used Reed Stylus

Ancient Sumerians used sharpened reed stylus for inscribing on wet clay tablets in 3500 BCE. Continue reading

The Pharaoh Menes

Menes (/ˈmiːniːz/; Ancient Egyptian: mnj, probably pronounced */maˈnij/; Ancient Greek: Μήνης) was a pharaoh of the Early Dynastic Period of ancient Egypt credited by classical tradition with having united Upper and Lower Egypt and as the founder of the First Dynasty.

The identity of Menes is the subject of ongoing debate, although mainstream Egyptological consensus identifies Menes with the Naqada III ruler Narmer (most likely) or First Dynasty pharaoh Hor-Aha. Both pharaohs are credited with the unification of Egypt to different degrees by various authorities.

More info at: Menes – Wikipedia

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Additional Information:

  • Menes – Wikipedia
    Menes. … c. 3200–3000 BC) (/ˈmiːniːz/; Ancient Egyptian: mnj, probably pronounced */maˈnij/; Ancient Greek: Μήνης) was a pharaoh of the Early Dynastic Period of ancient Egypt credited by classical tradition with having united Upper and Lower Egypt and as the founder of the First Dynasty.
  • Menes – Ancient History Encyclopedia
    Jan 29, 2016 – Menes (c. 3150 BCE) is the legendary first king of Egypt who is thought to have united Upper and Lower Egypt through conquest and founded …
  • Menes | king of Egypt | Britannica.com
    Menes, also spelled Mena, Meni, or Min, (flourished c. 2925 bce), legendary first king of unified Egypt, who, according to tradition, joined Upper and Lower Egypt in a single centralized monarchy. Manetho, a 3rd-century-bce Egyptian historian, called him Menes, the 5th-century-bce …
  • Menes: Legends Say He United Egypt Under its First Dynasty …
    This had led some to question if he even was a real historical figure, or if King Menes solely acted as a legendary founding father and hero for ancient Egyptians.
  • Menes Was the First Pharaoh of Egypt – ThoughtCo
    Oct 16, 2018 – Ancient Egyptian historians taught that Menes was the first pharaoh, the founder of the unified Egyptian state. But was it him or someone else?
  • Menes – Legend of the First King of Egypt – ThoughtCo
    Mar 7, 2017 – In Egyptian legend, the first king of Egypt was Menes. He is credited with introducing papyrus and writing (Pliny), founding cities, building dikes, …
  • Menes the 1st Pharaoh – KingTutOne.com
    King Menes is shrouded in mystery that may be lost in the folds of history forever. He is considered by many scholars to be the first pharaoh to rule Egypt and the …
  • Egypt: Who Was Menes? – Tour Egypt
    Tour Egypt presents information on Menes, the first king of the 1st Dynasty.
  • Menes | The Ancient Egypt Site
    According to the Ancient Egyptians themselves, the first king to have ruled over the whole of the country, was named Meni, or, in Greek, Menes. This is voiced …
  • King Menes Facts – Biography – YourDictionary
    King Menes facts: Menes’s reign of Egypt from 3407 to 3346 B.C. was treated as the dawn of Egyptian civilization in many classical histories. In earlier Egyptian …

First Egyptian Inscription Found for King Narmer

J.E. Quibell unearthed a small slate ceremonial slab with an inscription identifying King Menes at Hierakonpolis, Egypt in 1898 Continue reading

John Newbery

John Newbery (9 July 1713 – 22 December 1767), called “The Father of Children’s Literature”, was an English publisher of books who first made children’s literature a sustainable and profitable part of the literary market. He also supported and published the works of Christopher Smart, Oliver Goldsmith and Samuel Johnson. In recognition of his achievements the Newbery Medal was named after him in 1922.

By 1740 Newbery had started his publishing business in Reading. His first two publications were an edition of Richard Allestree’s The Whole Duty of Man and Miscellaneous Works Serious and Humerous [sic] In Verse and Prose. In 1743, Newbery left Reading, putting his stepson John Carnan in charge of his business there, and established a shop in London, first at the sign of the Bible and Crown near Devereux Court. He published several adult books, but became interested in expanding his business to children’s books. His first children’s book, A Little Pretty Pocket-Book, appeared 18 July 1744. :201 A Little Pretty Pocket-Book is the first in Newbery’s successful line of children’s books. The book cost six pence but for an extra two the purchaser received a red and black ball or pincushion. Newbery, like John Locke, believed that play was a better enticement to children’s good behaviour than physical discipline, and the child was to record their behaviour by either sticking a pin in the red side for good behaviour or the black side if they were bad. A Little Pretty Pocket-Book, though it would seem didactic today, was well received. Promising to “infallibly make Tommy a good boy and Polly a good girl”,:xiv it had poems, proverbs and an alphabet song. The book was child sized with a brightly coloured cover that appealed to children—something new in the publishing industry. Known as gift books, these early books became the precursor to the toy books popular in the nineteenth century. In developing his particular brand of children’s literature, Newbery borrowed techniques from other publishers, such as binding his books in Dutch floral paper and advertising his other products and books within the stories he wrote or commissioned This improvement in the quality of books for children, as well as the diversity of topics he published, helped make Newbery the leading producer of children’s books in his time.

More info at: John Newbery – Wikipedia

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Name(s):
      John Newbery
Birth:
      July 9, 1713, Waltham St Lawrence, United Kingdom
Death:
      December 22, 1767, Canonbury, London, United Kingdom
Children:
      Francis Newbery


Additional Information:

Sanskrit Didactic Verses

Upanishads are compilations of teachings written in 500 BCE by Hindu sages in a Sanskrit didactic style verse. Continue reading

Mother Goose Nursery Rhymes

First publishing of Mother Goose nursery rhymes, Mother Goose's Melody: or Sonnets for the Cradle, was published in London, England, in 1781 by Continue reading

First Children’s Fiction Book Published

John Newbery published a children's fiction book, The History of Little Goody Two-Shoes; or, Continue reading

Sinhalese Prose Writing

Sinhalese writing was found on rock inscriptions from 200 BCE around Sri Lanka. Continue reading

Archeologists Find Earliest Vocabulary List

Archeologists discovered an Akkadian vocabulary list in Mesopotamia from 600 BCE. Continue reading