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Robert de Boron

Robert de Boron (also spelled in the manuscripts “Bouron”, “Beron”) was a French poet of the late 12th and early 13th centuries who is most notable as the author of the poems Joseph d’Arimathe and Merlin. Though little is known about him outside of the poems he allegedly wrote, his works and their subsequent prose redactions impacted later incarnations of the Arthurian legend and its prose cycles, particularly due to his Christian backstory for the Holy Grail, originally an element of Chrétien de Troyes’s famously-unfinished Perceval.

More info at: Robert de Boron – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Robert de Boron
Occupation:
      French poet
Birth:
      Boron, Territoire de Belfort, France


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