Henry Maudslay

Henry Maudslay (pronunciation and spelling) (22 August 1771 – 14 February 1831) was an English machine tool innovator, tool and die maker, and inventor. He is considered a founding father of machine tool technology. His inventions were an important foundation for the Industrial Revolution.

Maudslay’s invention of a metal lathe to cut metal, circa 1800, enabled the manufacture of standard screw thread sizes. Standard screw thread sizes allowed interchangeable parts and the development of mass production.

More info at: Henry Maudslay – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Henry Maudslay
Birth:
      August 22, 1771, Woolwich, London, United Kingdom
Death:
      February 14, 1831, Lambeth, London, United Kingdom
Place of burial:
      Woolwich, London, United Kingdom
Spouse:
      Sarah Tindel (m. 1791)
Children:
      William Maudslay
Significant advance:
      Machine tool


Additional Information:

Samuel Pierpont Langley

Title: Samuel Pierpont Langley

Samuel Pierpont Langley (August 22, 1834 – February 27, 1906) was an American astronomer, physicist, inventor of the bolometer and aviation pioneer.

He attended Boston Latin School, graduated from English High School of Boston, was an assistant in the Harvard College Observatory, then moved to a job ostensibly as a professor of mathematics at the United States Naval Academy, but actually was sent there to restore the Academy’s small observatory. In 1867, he became the director of the Allegheny Observatory and a professor of astronomy at the Western University of Pennsylvania, now known as the University of Pittsburgh, a post he kept until 1891 even while he became the third Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution in 1887. Langley was the founder of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. In 1888 Langley was elected a member of the American Antiquarian Society. In 1898, he received the Prix Jules Janssen, the highest award of the Société astronomique de France, the French astronomical society.

More info at: Samuel Pierpont Langley – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Samuel Pierpont Langley
Birth:
      August 22, 1834, Roxbury, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Death:
      February 27, 1906, Aiken, South Carolina, United States
Known for:
      Solar physics
Education:
      The English High School,
      Boston Latin School,
      Boston High School
Awards:
      Rumford Medal,
      Henry Draper Medal,
      Rumford Prize,
      John Scott Legacy Medal and Premium


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