St. Fabiola

Saint Fabiola was a nurse (physician) and Roman matron of rank of the company of noble Roman women who, under the influence of the Church father St. Jerome gave up all earthly pleasures and devoted themselves to the practice of Christian asceticism and charitable work.[1]

More info at: Saint Fabiola – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      St. Fabiola
Birth:
      Rome, Italy
Death:
      December 27, 399 AD, Rome, Italy
Feast:
      27 December
Canonized:
      Pre-Congregation


Additional Information:

Italy Opens First Public Hospital

Christian convert St. Fabiola, founded the first public hospital in Rome Italy in 396 Continue reading

David Low

Sir David Alexander Cecil Low (7 April 1891 – 19 September 1963) was a New Zealand political cartoonist and caricaturist who lived and worked in the United Kingdom for many years. Low was a self-taught cartoonist. Born in New Zealand, he worked in his native country before migrating to Sydney in 1911, and ultimately to London (1919), where he made his career and earned fame for his Colonel Blimp depictions and his merciless satirising of the personalities and policies of German dictator Adolf Hitler, Italian dictator Benito Mussolini, Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin, and other leaders of his times.

Low was born and educated in New Zealand. His first work was published when he was only 11 years old. His professional career began at The Canterbury Times in 1910. The following year he moved to Australia and worked for The Bulletin. His work attracted the attention of Henry Cadbury, the part owner of The Star, and Low moved to London in 1919, working for that paper until 1927, when he moved to the Evening Standard. There he produced his most famous work, chronicling the rise of fascism in the 1930s, the policy of Appeasement, and the conflict of World War II. His stinging depictions of Hitler and Mussolini led to his work being banned in Italy and Germany, and his being named in The Black Book.

More info at: David Low (cartoonist) – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      David Low
Occupation:
      Cartoonist
Birth:
      April 7, 1891
      Dunedin, New Zealand
Death:
      September 19, 1963
      Kensington, London, United Kingdom
Spouse:
      Madeline Grieve Kenning
      (m. 1920–1963)
Children:
      Rachael Low
Education:
      Christchurch Boys’ High School


Additional Information:

David Low was First Chiropodist

British corn-cutter, David Low termed the word “chiropodist” in his textbook Chiropodologia in 1785. Continue reading

Galileo Galilei

Galileo Galilei (Italian: [ɡaliˈlɛːo ɡaliˈlɛi]; 15 February 1564 – 8 January 1642) was an Italian astronomer, physicist and engineer, sometimes described as a polymath. Galileo has been called the “father of observational astronomy”, the “father of modern physics”, the “father of the scientific method”, and the “father of modern science”.

Galileo studied speed and velocity, gravity and free fall, the principle of relativity, inertia, projectile motion and also worked in applied science and technology, describing the properties of pendulums and “hydrostatic balances”, inventing the thermoscope and various military compasses, and using the telescope for scientific observations of celestial objects. His contributions to observational astronomy include the telescopic confirmation of the phases of Venus, the observation of the four largest satellites of Jupiter, the observation of Saturn and the analysis of sunspots.

More info at: Galileo Galilei – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person's firsts:

Name(s):
      Galileo Galilei
Occupation:
      Astronomer, Physicist, Engineer, and sometimes described as a Polymath
Birth:
      February 15, 1564, Pisa, Italy
Death:
      January 8, 1642, Arcetri


Additional Information:

France Founded First Veterinary School

France founded the first veterinary school in 1762.

The first veterinary school was founded in Lyon, France in 1762 by Claude Bourgelat. Continue reading

Bernardino Ramazzini

Bernardino Ramazzini (4 October 1633 – 5 November 1714) was an Italian physician. (Italian pronunciation: [bernarˈdino ramats’tsini]). Ramazzini, along with Francesco Torti, was an early proponent of the use of cinchona bark (from which quinine is derived) in the treatment of Malaria. His most important contribution to medicine was his book on occupational diseases, De Morbis Artificum Diatriba (“Diseases of Workers”).

More info at: Bernardino Ramazzini – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Bernardino Ramazzini
Occupation:
      Physician
Birth:
      October 4, 1633, Carpi, Italy
Death:
      November 5, 1714, Padua, Italy
Educations:
      University of Parma


Additional Information:

Invention of the Pyroelectric Ear Thermometer

Jacob Fraden, a physician in San Diego, CA, USA invented the pyroelectric ear thermometer in 1990. Continue reading

Silver Amalgam Fillings Invented in France

Thomas W. Evans, an American dentist developed silver amalgam tooth fillings while in France during 1845. Continue reading

First Physician to Specialize in Occupational Medicine

Italian physician Bernardino L Ramazzini was the first to specialize in occupational medicine while a professor at the Universities of Modena (1682-1700) and Padua (1700-1714). Continue reading