Egyptian Painting Depicts Movement

An artist depicts a wrestling sequence as a continuous movement decorated Continue reading

Muawiyah I

Muawiyah I (Arabic: معاوية بن أبي سفيان‎, Muʿāwiyah ibn Abī Sufyān; 602 – 26 April 680) was the founder and first caliph of the Umayyad Caliphate. He was the first who established the Umayyad dynasty in Islam of the caliphate, and was the second caliph from the Umayyad clan, the first being Uthman ibn Affan.

Muawiyah was appointed as the Governor of Syria after his brother Yazid ibn Abu Sufyan died. During the time of Ali ibn Abi Talib, Muawiyah convinced Talha and Zubayr to revolt against Ali. This led to the Battle of the Camel, the first battle in the First Fitna (the first Islamic civil war). In 657, Muawiya’s army attacked the army of Ali at the Battle of Siffin. After the death of Ali in 661, Muawiya’s army approached that of Ali’s son and successor, Hasan ibn Ali. In order to avoid further bloodshed, Hasan signed a peace treaty with Muawiyah. Muawiyah then assumed power; however, Muawiyah ended up breaking all his requirements set out by the peace treaty.

More info at: Muawiyah I – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Muawiyah bin Abi-Sufyan
Occupation:
      Founder and first caliph of the Umayyad Caliphate
Birth:
      602 AD, Mecca, Saudi Arabia
Death:
      680 AD, Damascus, Syria


Additional Information:

Islamic Revivalist Reform Movement In Persia

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Vladimir Ilyich Lenin

Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov, better known by the alias Lenin (22 April 1870 – 21 January 1924), was a Russian communist revolutionary, politician and political theorist. He served as head of government of Soviet Russia from 1917 to 1924 and of the Soviet Union from 1922 to 1924. Continue reading

Bolshevik Revolution of 1917

The first successful Russian Communist Revolution was the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. Continue reading

Gautama Siddhartha

Gautama Buddha (c. 563 BCE/480 BCE – c. 483 BCE/400 BCE), also known as Siddhārtha Gautama [sid̪ːʱɑːrt̪ʰə gəut̪əmə], Shakyamuni Buddha [ɕɑːkjəmun̪i bud̪ːʱə], or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was an ascetic (śramaṇa) and sage, on whose teachings Buddhism was founded. He is believed to have lived and taught mostly in the eastern part of ancient India sometime between the sixth and fourth centuries BCE.

Gautama taught a Middle Way between sensual indulgence and the severe asceticism found in the śramaṇa movement common in his region. He later taught throughout other regions of eastern India such as Magadha and Kosala.

Gautama is the primary figure in Buddhism. He is recognized by Buddhists as an enlightened teacher who attained full Buddhahood, and shared his insights to help sentient beings end rebirth and suffering. Accounts of his life, discourses, and monastic rules are believed by Buddhists to have been summarized after his death and memorized by his followers. Various collections of teachings attributed to him were passed down by oral tradition and first committed to writing about 400 years later.

More info at: Gautama Buddha – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Gautame Siddhartha
Occupation:
      Founder of Buddhism
Birth:
      c. 563 BCE or c. 480 BCE
     Lumbini, Shakya Republic
Death:
      c. 483 BCE or c. 400 BCE
     Kushinagar, Malla Republic


Additional Information:

Jainism, Atheistic religious movement

Jainism, Atheistic religious movement that arose in India in the sixth century BCE, was founded by Vardhamana Mahavira, Principles being the salvation of an individual soul as the consequence of an ascetic life leading to detachment from material things. Continue reading