Galileo Galilei

Galileo Galilei (Italian: [ɡaliˈlɛːo ɡaliˈlɛi]; 15 February 1564 – 8 January 1642) was an Italian astronomer, physicist and engineer, sometimes described as a polymath. Galileo has been called the “father of observational astronomy”, the “father of modern physics”, the “father of the scientific method”, and the “father of modern science”.

Galileo studied speed and velocity, gravity and free fall, the principle of relativity, inertia, projectile motion and also worked in applied science and technology, describing the properties of pendulums and “hydrostatic balances”, inventing the thermoscope and various military compasses, and using the telescope for scientific observations of celestial objects. His contributions to observational astronomy include the telescopic confirmation of the phases of Venus, the observation of the four largest satellites of Jupiter, the observation of Saturn and the analysis of sunspots.

More info at: Galileo Galilei – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person's firsts:

Name(s):
      Galileo Galilei
Occupation:
      Astronomer, Physicist, Engineer, and sometimes described as a Polymath
Birth:
      February 15, 1564, Pisa, Italy
Death:
      January 8, 1642, Arcetri


Additional Information:

Bernardino Ramazzini

Bernardino Ramazzini (4 October 1633 – 5 November 1714) was an Italian physician. (Italian pronunciation: [bernarˈdino ramats’tsini]). Ramazzini, along with Francesco Torti, was an early proponent of the use of cinchona bark (from which quinine is derived) in the treatment of Malaria. His most important contribution to medicine was his book on occupational diseases, De Morbis Artificum Diatriba (“Diseases of Workers”).

More info at: Bernardino Ramazzini – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Bernardino Ramazzini
Occupation:
      Physician
Birth:
      October 4, 1633, Carpi, Italy
Death:
      November 5, 1714, Padua, Italy
Educations:
      University of Parma


Additional Information:

First Physician to Specialize in Occupational Medicine

Italian physician Bernardino L Ramazzini was the first to specialize in occupational medicine while a professor at the Universities of Modena (1682-1700) and Padua (1700-1714). Continue reading

Occupational Medicine Treatise

Treatise on occupational medicine, De Morbis Artificum Diatriba (Diseases of Workers), published in 1700. Continue reading

Galileo Observed the Universe with Powerful Telescope

Galileo Galilei examined the night sky with a high powered telescope with sufficient resolving power for astronomical observation in Padua, Italy in 1609. Continue reading

Santorio Santorio Utilized Medical Measuring Instruments

Santorio Santorio, professor of medical theory at the University of Padua, Italy, from 1611 to 1624 utilized precise measuring instruments for medical research. Continue reading

Santorio Santorio

Santorio Santorio (29 March 1561 – 22 February 1636), also called Sanctorio Sanctorio, Santorio Santorii, Sanctorius of Padua, Sanctorio Sanctorius and various combinations of these names, was a Venetian physiologist, physician, and professor, who introduced the quantitative approach into medicine. Continue reading

Adapted Clinical Thermometer Designed by Galileo

Santorio Santorio adapted the clinical thermometer based on Galileo Galilei’s design in 1612. Continue reading

Galen

Aelius Galenus or Claudius Galenus (Greek: Κλαύδιος Γαληνός; September 129 AD – c. 200/c. 216), often Anglicized as Galen and better known as Galen of Pergamon (/ˈɡeɪlən/), was a Greek physician, surgeon and philosopher in the Roman Empire. Continue reading

Anatomist to break with Galen was the Flemish doctor Andreas Vesalius

Doctor Andreas Vesalius was an Anatomist who broke away from the teachings of the ancient Greek physician Galen. You see tradition was to teach the new doctors to be based on the Greek physician Galen. Continue reading