John Calvin

John Calvin (/ˈkælvɪn/;[1] French: Jean Calvin [ʒɑ̃ kalvɛ̃]; born Jehan Cauvin; 10 July 1509 – 27 May 1564) was a French theologian, pastor and reformer in Geneva during the Protestant Reformation. He was a principal figure in the development of the system of Christian theology later called Calvinism, aspects of which include the doctrines of predestination and of the absolute sovereignty of God in salvation of the human soul from death and eternal damnation, in which doctrines Calvin was influenced by and elaborated upon the Augustinian and other Christian traditions. Various Congregational, Reformed and Presbyterian churches, which look to Calvin as the chief expositor of their beliefs, have spread throughout the world.

Calvin was a tireless polemic and apologetic writer who generated much controversy. He also exchanged cordial and supportive letters with many reformers, including Philipp Melanchthon and Heinrich Bullinger. In addition to his seminal Institutes of the Christian Religion, Calvin wrote commentaries on most books of the Bible, confessional documents, and various other theological treatises.

More info at: John Calvin – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      John Calvin
Birth:
      July 10, 1509, Noyon, France
Death:
      May 27, 1564, Geneva, Switzerland
Spouse:
      Idelette Calvin (m. 1540–1549)


Additional Information:

French Psalms Written in Metrical Format

French poet, Clement Marot published 30 French psalms in metrical version, Trente Pseaumes de David (Thirty Psalms of David) in 1542. Continue reading

Laozi

Laozi (571 BC - 471 BC)(UK: /ˈlaʊˈzɪə/, US: /ˈlaʊˈtsiː/; also Li Er or Lao-Tzu /ˈlaʊˈtsuː/, /ˈlaʊˈdzʌ/ or Lao-Tze /ˈlaʊˈdzeɪ/; Chinese: 老子; pinyin: Lǎozǐ, literally "Old Master") was an ancient Chinese philosopher and writer.

Taoist Religious Community Founded

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The Yellow Turban Rebellion

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Gautama Siddhartha

Gautama Buddha (c. 563 BCE/480 BCE – c. 483 BCE/400 BCE), also known as Siddhārtha Gautama [sid̪ːʱɑːrt̪ʰə gəut̪əmə], Shakyamuni Buddha [ɕɑːkjəmun̪i bud̪ːʱə], or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was an ascetic (śramaṇa) and sage, on whose teachings Buddhism was founded. He is believed to have lived and taught mostly in the eastern part of ancient India sometime between the sixth and fourth centuries BCE.

Gautama taught a Middle Way between sensual indulgence and the severe asceticism found in the śramaṇa movement common in his region. He later taught throughout other regions of eastern India such as Magadha and Kosala.

Gautama is the primary figure in Buddhism. He is recognized by Buddhists as an enlightened teacher who attained full Buddhahood, and shared his insights to help sentient beings end rebirth and suffering. Accounts of his life, discourses, and monastic rules are believed by Buddhists to have been summarized after his death and memorized by his followers. Various collections of teachings attributed to him were passed down by oral tradition and first committed to writing about 400 years later.

More info at: Gautama Buddha – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Gautame Siddhartha
Occupation:
      Founder of Buddhism
Birth:
      c. 563 BCE or c. 480 BCE
     Lumbini, Shakya Republic
Death:
      c. 483 BCE or c. 400 BCE
     Kushinagar, Malla Republic


Additional Information:

Jainism, Atheistic religious movement

Jainism, Atheistic religious movement that arose in India in the sixth century BCE, was founded by Vardhamana Mahavira, Principles being the salvation of an individual soul as the consequence of an ascetic life leading to detachment from material things. Continue reading