Constantine I – Emperor of Rome

Constantine the Great (Latin: Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus Augustus; Greek: Κωνσταντῖνος ὁ Μέγας; 27 February c. 272 AD – 22 May 337 AD), also known as Constantine I or Saint Constantine (in the Orthodox Church as Saint Constantine the Great, Equal-to-the-Apostles), was a Roman Emperor of Illyrian-Greek origin from 306 to 337 AD. Continue reading

Circus Maximus in Rome

A giant sports arena, originally used for chariot races and later for contests pitting humans against wild animals, the Circus Maximus in Rome, was open-air structure with seats on three sides. Continue reading

Serfs in Europe

A law promulgated by the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great in 332 CE required serfs to remain on the land and to submit to the demands of the lord and his agents. Continue reading

Formal attempt to define the nature of Jesus

A formal attempt was undertaken in 325 by a council of delegates from the various Christian churches, summoned and presided over by Roman Emperor Constantine, (though he was not yet a baptized convert), at Nicaea (now Iznik, Turkey), to define the nature of Jesus. Continue reading

Ecumenical Christian creed was the Nicene Creed

Ecumenical Christian creed was the Nicene Creed

Nicaea Creed (also called the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed) was the first Ecumenical Christian creed. Continue reading

Christian hospitals were founded after the abolition of pagan healing temples

In 331 CE, the Roman emperor Constantine after his conversion, abolish of the pagan healing temples, and replaced with the founding of Christian hospitals. Continue reading

Sunday sabbath was celebrated in 325 CE

Previously, in accordance with Jewish religious practice, the sabbath had been celebrated on Saturday, being seventh day of the week. Continue reading