Galileo Galilei

Galileo Galilei (Italian: [ɡaliˈlɛːo ɡaliˈlɛi]; 15 February 1564 – 8 January 1642) was an Italian astronomer, physicist and engineer, sometimes described as a polymath. Galileo has been called the “father of observational astronomy”, the “father of modern physics”, the “father of the scientific method”, and the “father of modern science”.

Galileo studied speed and velocity, gravity and free fall, the principle of relativity, inertia, projectile motion and also worked in applied science and technology, describing the properties of pendulums and “hydrostatic balances”, inventing the thermoscope and various military compasses, and using the telescope for scientific observations of celestial objects. His contributions to observational astronomy include the telescopic confirmation of the phases of Venus, the observation of the four largest satellites of Jupiter, the observation of Saturn and the analysis of sunspots.

More info at: Galileo Galilei – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person's firsts:

Name(s):
      Galileo Galilei
Occupation:
      Astronomer, Physicist, Engineer, and sometimes described as a Polymath
Birth:
      February 15, 1564, Pisa, Italy
Death:
      January 8, 1642, Arcetri


Additional Information:

Galileo Observed the Universe with Powerful Telescope

Galileo Galilei examined the night sky with a high powered telescope with sufficient resolving power for astronomical observation in Padua, Italy in 1609. Continue reading

Moon Soil Samples Collected

Soviet lunar probe Luna 16, returned with moon soil samples on September 12, 1970. Continue reading

Moon Map Published by Hevelius

Johannes Hevelius (born Jan Heweliusz) from Gdansk, Poland published a moon map in the Selenographia in 1647. Continue reading

Sunspot Observations

According to the Chinese book The Ocean of Jade China was observing sunspots. Continue reading

Soviets Spacecraft Hits the Moon

On September 12, 1959, the Soviets launched a spacecraft called Luna 2 from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Continue reading

First Photograph of the Sun

In 1845, Jean-Bernard-Leon Foucault, a French physicist and inventor, took a photograph of the sun. Continue reading

Soft landing of Luna 9 on the moon

Soviet spacecraft called Luna 9 made a soft landing on the moon’s surface on February 3, 1966. Continue reading

First Published Ephemeris

Let’s begin with the definition of the word Ephemeris:

Ephemeris is a table or data file giving the calculated positions of a celestial object at regular intervals throughout a period or basically a diary of celestial objects positions.
Continue reading

Nicolaus Copernicus

Nicolaus Copernicus (/koʊˈpɜːrnɪkəs, kə-/; Polish: Mikołaj Kopernik; German: Nikolaus Kopernikus; Niklas Koppernigk; 19 February 1473 – 24 May 1543) was a Renaissance- and Reformation-era mathematician and astronomer who formulated a model of the universe that placed the Sun rather than the Earth at the center of the universe, likely independently of Aristarchus of Samos, who had formulated such a model some eighteen centuries earlier. Continue reading