Palace of Westminster Had The First Patented Cooling System

Palace of Westminster, Houses of Parliament in London, England was the first building with a patented cooling system installed in 1834. Jacob Perkins, an expatriate American inventor patented the idea in 1831 then installed during the building’s reconstruction following a destructive fire. The system comprised of cool air entering from the Thames River through pipes that pulled in a draft created by maintaining attic fires.

Date:
      1831, 1834
Name(s):
      Jacob Perkins
Occupation:
      Inventor
Location:
      London, England


Additional Information:

  • Palace of Westminster – Wikipedia
    Barry was a classical architect, but he was aided by the Gothic architect Augustus Pugin. Westminster Hall, which was built in the 11th century and survived the fire of 1834, was incorporated in Barry’s design.
  • Jacob Perkins – The Father of the Refrigerator – History of Refrigeration …
    Jacob Perkins (1766 – 1849) was an American inventor, mechanical engineer and physicist. … Jacob Perkins was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, and went to school in Newburyport until he was 12. … Perkins was granted the first patent for the vapor-compression refrigeration cycle,
  • Jacob Perkins – Wikipedia
    Jacob Perkins (9 July 1766 – 30 July 1849) was an American inventor, mechanical engineer …. Perkins applied his Hermetic tube system to steam locomotive boilers and a number of locomotives using this … cycle, assigned on August 14, 1835 and titled, “Apparatus and means for producing ice, and in cooling fluids.
  • Development of Refrigeration – Vintage Minnesota Hockey – History
    In 1834 Jacob Perkins obtained a British patent on a volatile-liquid closed-cycle … Less than two weeks after the opening of the Ice Palace in New York the North … The refrigeration system is by means of compressed liquid ammonia allowed to … along with Vancouver, Victoria, and New Westminster, were member of the …

Abbot Suger

Suger’s family origins are unknown. Several times in his writings he suggests that his was a humble background, though this may just be a topos or convention of autobiographical writing. In 1091, at the age of ten, Suger was given as an oblate to the abbey of St. Denis, where he began his education. He trained at the priory of Saint-Denis de l’Estrée, and there first met the future king Louis VI of France. From 1104 to 1106, Suger attended another school, perhaps that attached to the abbey of Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire. In 1106 he became secretary to the abbot of Saint-Denis. In the following year he became provost of Berneval in Normandy, and in 1109 of Toury. In 1118, Louis VI sent Suger to the court of Pope Gelasius II at Maguelonne (at Montpellier, Gulf of Lyon), and he lived from 1121 to 1122 at the court of Gelasius’s successor, Calixtus II.

On his return from Maguelonne, Suger became abbot of St-Denis. Until 1127, he occupied himself at court mainly with the temporal affairs of the kingdom, while during the following decade he devoted himself to the reorganization and reform of St-Denis. In 1137, he accompanied the future king, Louis VII, into Aquitaine on the occasion of that prince’s marriage to Eleanor of Aquitaine, and during the Second Crusade served as one of the regents of the kingdom (1147–1149). He bitterly opposed the king’s divorce, having himself advised the marriage. Although he disapproved of the Second Crusade, he himself, at the time of his death, had started preaching a new crusade.

More info at: Abbot Suger – Wikipedia

Name(s):
      Abbot Suger
Occupation:
      Statesman, Historian
Birth:
      1081, Chennevières-lès-Louvres, France
Death:
      January 13, 1151, Saint-Denis, Seine-Saint-Denis, France

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:


Additional Information:

Abbey of St-Denis Built in Gothic Style

Abbey of St-Denis in Paris, France was built in the Gothic style as founded by King Dagobert I in 7th Century and rebuilt by Abbot Suger in 1144. Continue reading

First Iron-Framed Library Built in Paris

Bibliotheque Sainte-Genevieve was the first iron-frame building built in Paris, France between 1843 to 1850 by architect Henri Labrouste. Continue reading

Leonardo da Vinci

Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci (Italian: [leoˈnardo di ˌsɛr ˈpjɛːro da (v)ˈvintʃi] ( listen); 15 April 1452 – 2 May 1519), more commonly Leonardo da Vinci or simply Leonardo, was an Italian polymath whose areas of interest included invention, painting, sculpting, architecture, science, music, mathematics, engineering, literature, anatomy, geology, astronomy, botany, writing, history, and cartography. Continue reading

Cooling system for buildings

Leonardo da Vinci apparently designed cooling system for buildings. In fact it started with a noblewoman Isabella d’Este, whose home was in Mantua, Italy, where Leonardo da Vinci was a guest in 1500. The cool air, was created by a paddlewheel in an enclosed water-filled chamber, which was blown into the room by a bellows.

Additional Information:

Date:
      1500

Name(s):
      Leonardo da Vinci

Occupation:
      Artist,
      Inventor,
      Visionairy

Location:
      Mantua, Italy

Reinforced concrete house built in Paris, France

Francois Coignet embedded wrought-iron, I-beams, into the concrete of the roof and the floors of a house he built in Paris, France, in 1862. Continue reading

Building Taller 1500 feet

The World Financial Center in Shanghai, China, on its planned completion date in 2001, was to be 1,507 feet (460 meters) high. Continue reading