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Alfred Nobel

Alfred Bernhard Nobel (/noʊˈbɛl/; Swedish: [ˈalfrɛd nʊˈbɛlː] (About this soundlisten); 21 October 1833 – 10 December 1896) was a Swedish chemist, engineer, inventor, businessman, and philanthropist.

Known for inventing dynamite, Nobel also owned Bofors, which he had redirected from its previous role as primarily an iron and steel producer to a major manufacturer of cannon and other armaments. Nobel held 355 different patents, dynamite being the most famous. After reading a premature obituary which condemned him for profiting from the sales of arms, he bequeathed his fortune to institute the Nobel Prizes. The synthetic element nobelium was named after him. His name also survives in modern-day companies such as Dynamit Nobel and AkzoNobel, which are descendants of mergers with companies Nobel himself established.

More info at: Alfred Nobel – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Alfred Nobel
Birth:
      October 21, 1833, Stockholm, Sweden
Death:
      December 10, 1896, Sanremo, Italy
Known for:
      Benefactor of the Nobel Prize, inventor of dynamite


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