John Calvin

John Calvin (/ˈkælvɪn/;[1] French: Jean Calvin [ʒɑ̃ kalvɛ̃]; born Jehan Cauvin; 10 July 1509 – 27 May 1564) was a French theologian, pastor and reformer in Geneva during the Protestant Reformation. He was a principal figure in the development of the system of Christian theology later called Calvinism, aspects of which include the doctrines of predestination and of the absolute sovereignty of God in salvation of the human soul from death and eternal damnation, in which doctrines Calvin was influenced by and elaborated upon the Augustinian and other Christian traditions. Various Congregational, Reformed and Presbyterian churches, which look to Calvin as the chief expositor of their beliefs, have spread throughout the world.

Calvin was a tireless polemic and apologetic writer who generated much controversy. He also exchanged cordial and supportive letters with many reformers, including Philipp Melanchthon and Heinrich Bullinger. In addition to his seminal Institutes of the Christian Religion, Calvin wrote commentaries on most books of the Bible, confessional documents, and various other theological treatises.

More info at: John Calvin – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      John Calvin
Birth:
      July 10, 1509, Noyon, France
Death:
      May 27, 1564, Geneva, Switzerland
Spouse:
      Idelette Calvin (m. 1540–1549)


Additional Information:

Protestant Heretic Martyred in France

Spanish physician, Michael Servetus was the first Protestant martyr following the publication of his books refuting the concept of the Trinity, Continue reading

Calvinist Reformed Church in Switzerland

John Calvin (born Jean Cauvin) founded the Calvinist Reformed Church in Geneva, Switzerland from a community of French Protestant refugees in 1536. Continue reading

Alfred Nobel

Alfred Bernhard Nobel (/noʊˈbɛl/; Swedish: [ˈalfrɛd nʊˈbɛlː] (About this soundlisten); 21 October 1833 – 10 December 1896) was a Swedish chemist, engineer, inventor, businessman, and philanthropist.

Known for inventing dynamite, Nobel also owned Bofors, which he had redirected from its previous role as primarily an iron and steel producer to a major manufacturer of cannon and other armaments. Nobel held 355 different patents, dynamite being the most famous. After reading a premature obituary which condemned him for profiting from the sales of arms, he bequeathed his fortune to institute the Nobel Prizes. The synthetic element nobelium was named after him. His name also survives in modern-day companies such as Dynamit Nobel and AkzoNobel, which are descendants of mergers with companies Nobel himself established.

More info at: Alfred Nobel – Wikipedia

Additional Articles associated with this person’s firsts:

Name(s):
      Alfred Nobel
Birth:
      October 21, 1833, Stockholm, Sweden
Death:
      December 10, 1896, Sanremo, Italy
Known for:
      Benefactor of the Nobel Prize, inventor of dynamite


Additional Information:

Tunnel Linking France and Switzerland

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First Organized Slalom Race

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Horace-Bénédict de Saussure

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Alpine Mountaineer Pioneered Ascents in the Swiss Alps

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First Machine Manufactured Chocolate

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Comic strip published as a booklet

Rodolphe Topffer of Geneva, Switzerland, artist and writer of a comic strip called The Adventures of Dr. Festus. Continue reading