Archaeologists Discover Houses in Anatolia

Archaeologists discover houses in the village of Zawi Chenui, south-eastern Anatolia along the Turkish-Iranian border dating back to 9000 BCE. Continue reading

Galen

Aelius Galenus or Claudius Galenus (Greek: Κλαύδιος Γαληνός; September 129 AD – c. 200/c. 216), often Anglicized as Galen and better known as Galen of Pergamon (/ˈɡeɪlən/), was a Greek physician, surgeon and philosopher in the Roman Empire. Continue reading

Constantine I – Emperor of Rome

Constantine the Great (Latin: Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus Augustus; Greek: Κωνσταντῖνος ὁ Μέγας; 27 February c. 272 AD – 22 May 337 AD), also known as Constantine I or Saint Constantine (in the Orthodox Church as Saint Constantine the Great, Equal-to-the-Apostles), was a Roman Emperor of Illyrian-Greek origin from 306 to 337 AD. Continue reading

Invention of Cold cream

The influential physician Galen of Pergamon (now Bergama, Turkey), invented Cold cream, circa 180 CE, by mixing water, beeswax, and olive oil into a face cream that was effective in cooling and softening the skin at same time. Continue reading

Formal attempt to define the nature of Jesus

A formal attempt was undertaken in 325 by a council of delegates from the various Christian churches, summoned and presided over by Roman Emperor Constantine, (though he was not yet a baptized convert), at Nicaea (now Iznik, Turkey), to define the nature of Jesus. Continue reading

Ecumenical Christian creed was the Nicene Creed

Ecumenical Christian creed was the Nicene Creed

Nicaea Creed (also called the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed) was the first Ecumenical Christian creed. Continue reading

Christian hospitals were founded after the abolition of pagan healing temples

In 331 CE, the Roman emperor Constantine after his conversion, abolish of the pagan healing temples, and replaced with the founding of Christian hospitals. Continue reading

Sunday sabbath was celebrated in 325 CE

Previously, in accordance with Jewish religious practice, the sabbath had been celebrated on Saturday, being seventh day of the week. Continue reading

Alexander the Great

Alexander III of Macedon (20/21 July 356 BC – 10/11 June 323 BC), commonly known as Alexander the Great (Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος ὁ Μέγας, Aléxandros ho Mégas Koine Greek: [a.lék.san.dros ho mé.gas]), was a king (basileus) of the Ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon and a member of the Argead dynasty. Continue reading

Persian Royal Road a very long road

The road called Persian Royal Road ran east-west across Anatolia for more than 1,500 miles (2,400 km) between the capital city of Susa, Persia (now the village of Shush, Iran), and Smyrna (now Iz-mir, Turkey), on the Aegean coast, passing through Nineveh and Haran, with a second terminus at Ephesus. Continue reading