Nuclear weapons test moratorium was observed

Unofficially on November 1958 to September 1961, the three nuclear powers, the United States, the United Kingdom, and the Soviet Union held a nuclear weapons testing moratorium. Continue reading

Masaru Ibuka

Ibuka graduated from Waseda University in 1933, he then went to work at Photo-Chemical Laboratory, a company which processed movie film, and later served in the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II, being a member of the Imperial Navy Wartime Research Committee. Continue reading

Dental X-rays

C. Edmund Kells of New Orleans, LA, USA, a dentist and inventor, built the first X-ray machine in the United States in 1896, which was shortly after the discovery of radiography by the German scientist Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen in 1895. Continue reading

Close-up photographs of Jupiter

The U.S.-built planetary probe Pioneer 10 satellite was launched on March 2, 1972, from Cape Canaveral, FL, USA. Then on December 3, 1973, as Pioneer 10 passed Jupiter, it took Close-up photographs of of the giant planet. Continue reading

Daniel Cohen

Co-Founder of Center for the Study of Human Polymorphisms, now called Fondation Jean Dausset-CEPH.
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Akio Morita

Akio Morita was born in Nagoya, Aichi, Japan. Morita’s family was involved in sake, miso and soy sauce production in the village of Kosugaya (currently a part of Tokoname City) on the western coast of Chita Peninsula in Aichi Prefecture since 1665. Continue reading

The Human chromosome mapped

Published in October 1992 in the journals Nature and Science, were the Human chromosome gene-linkage maps. Continue reading

Japanese company to sell stock on United States stock exchanges

Sony KK, was the first Japanese company to sell stock on United States stock exchanges. Continue reading

Telephone hot line between nations

Instituted on June 20, 1963, between the United States and the Soviet Union, a telephone hot line connected both countries. Continue reading

John Bardeen

John Bardeen (/bɑːrˈdiːn/; May 23, 1908 – January 30, 1991) was an American physicist and electrical engineer, the only person to have won the Nobel Prize in Physics twice: first in 1956 with William Shockley and Walter Brattain for the invention of the transistor; and again in 1972 with Leon N Cooper and John Robert Schrieffer for a fundamental theory of conventional superconductivity known as the BCS theory. Continue reading